Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: Knitter's Review Retreat details and Sheepshow
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 Knitting Talk
 Sock Forum
 Encouragement for socks please!!
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

reteng
Warming Up

74 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  10:05:45 AM  Show Profile Send reteng a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am a veteran quilter but new knitter. I have enjoyed knitting simple scarves and really want to learn to knit socks. I purchased three sock knitting books and am starting with the Schurch class sock on DPNs. After much ripping and restarting, I completed the ribbing and the heel flap. Once I finished the heel turn I discovered I had one extra stitch leftover. Not being experienced enough to problem-solve where I went wrong, I ripped out a huge chunk yet again. As I look ahead to the directions for the gusset, I feel overwhelmed by the techniques I don't know. My husband has watched me knit and rip, knit and rip, and wonders why I don't just give up and buy socks. I guess I'd like to know if my experience is a common one or if most new sock knitters just fly through the directions with no trouble. Is there hope for me?

socker
Chatty Knitter

258 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  10:43:00 AM  Show Profile Send socker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I knit my first sock about 6 times. Many, many socks later, and the one I'm kniting now.....was from the toe to the heel turn and is now at the toe again.
Go to Top of Page

socks4all
Permanent Resident

USA
1460 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  11:18:27 AM  Show Profile Send socks4all a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes, it is common. There is a lot of shaping involved in making a pair of socks. Study the paictures and websites. The construction concepts can be hard to grasp. Also, this is not quilting. You are capable of ripping out and starting again without destroying your yarn. Also, "close" can be good enough. If you come out with one st too many or one too few you can fudge. It is not like those persnickety points that must meet just so. Since you are a quilter you have my utmost respect. Patience. Don't beat yourself up. You CAN do this.
Go to Top of Page

vviolet
Chatty Knitter

148 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  11:33:21 AM  Show Profile Send vviolet a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm very new at sock knitting, too. Have the same book (Elizabeth Schurch) and a couple of others. Ripping and restarting, ripping and restarting, needles falling out, getting lost on the needles, etc., etc., etc. I can't image anyone just flying through her first sock! For me, knitting isn't about making a garment that I could easily buy. It's about learning something new. It's about enjoying beautiful yarn, problem solving, making friends that are interested in knitting. It's also about glorying in accomplishments, no matter how small. Frustration is part of the deal, but it is worth it. You got through the heel flap? That's great! Only one extra stitch left over? Not bad at all...Please keep trying! Please bring your questions, frustrations, and victories here to share with us.

"I always try to do that what I cannot do in order to learn how to do it." -- Picasso
Go to Top of Page

Cheerleader9
Permanent Resident

USA
1563 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  2:51:27 PM  Show Profile Send Cheerleader9 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hey Sweetie. It's a rite of passage. Put it another way.. Look at what you are learning. Making socks are a "feet" of engineering! I felt the same way with my first try. Dearly love those little darlings now :-) Don't give up. You'll become an addict after that first pair. Hang in there.


Barb in AZ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cheerleader9
http://www.ravelry.com/people/Cheerleader9
Go to Top of Page

watcher
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
449 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  6:05:08 PM  Show Profile Send watcher a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Sometimes, when I'm decreasing the gussets, I "miss" a decrease on one side. If I'm just a row or two past it, I will usually rip back (it's the perfectionist gene, thanks so much my ancestors!); if I've gotten down to the end of the gusset, I just decrease on the side I missed one more time. It won't make any difference to the fit of the sock (and even you'll have trouble finding it later)! Keep going, if you've finished the gussets you're almost there!

My first sock never got a mate...but it was out of scraps of leftover acrylic worsted because I wasn't sure I could actually knit a sock and didn't want to buy more supplies. The second pair was out of Socks(X3), Lucy Neatby's traveling socks (I forget the exact name) and seemed to take forever...but they were finished.

I'm a confirmed sock addict, they are my portable project for times when I have to wait, a great way to try new stitches since they aren't really very big, fun to use colors you might not wear otherwise, good for using up leftovers, and yes, my sock drawer is full of hand-knit socks! And I have several Sterlite containers with more sock yarn...two pair one the needles at present...
Go to Top of Page

minh
Permanent Resident and Destasher Extraordinnaire

USA
3458 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  6:25:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit minh's Homepage Send minh a Private Message  Reply with Quote
We're here to cheer you on! Please ask any questions you may have, sock addicts love to help and convert another knitter to the dark side ;)

I agree with the above posts that understanding each piece of the shaping before knitting it is very helpful.
Clara has a very good overview of sock construction here:
http://knittersreview.com/article_how_to.asp?article=/review/profile/070719_a.asp

My first pair of socks had holes near the heel but they're a labor of love!
Go to Top of Page

arlinem
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
442 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  6:26:48 PM  Show Profile Send arlinem a Private Message  Reply with Quote
absolutely don't give up! there's nothing like a pair of handmade socks for fit and comfort and warmth, not to mention satisfaction and portability. they can be simple and utilitarian or elaborate and fancy. sounds to me like you've gotten way past the hard part with hardly a scratch. you're nearly home! your feet won't care if there's an extra stitch along the way. keep at it and it will all fall into place and before you know it you'll be making socks for your husband in no time at all!
Go to Top of Page

MindyO
Permanent Resident

USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2009 :  8:50:41 PM  Show Profile Send MindyO a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Took me a year to finish my first pair, 6 months for the second, and I've already started pair 3 -5 time in the past week. I'll let you know in 3 months if I actually finish they're footies so they should take half as long as a whole pair right?

My Ravelry
My Flickr
My Facebook
Go to Top of Page

Pollyanna
New Pal

United Kingdom
41 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2009 :  01:01:46 AM  Show Profile Send Pollyanna a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm on my 7th pair and it is the first time I've knitted a sock without having to undo it!! YEAH!

I never thought I'd get the hang of it. I love knitting aran, so thought socks would be a nice change. Hubby loves them and it is only that which kept me going. I nearly had my eye out a few times with those 3 needles I can tell you.

Hang in there, you'll do it. On my first pair I made the mistake of using dark coloured wool, light is the best.
Go to Top of Page

fiddlerbird555
Permanent Resident

USA
1429 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2009 :  08:41:04 AM  Show Profile Send fiddlerbird555 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I still usually do at least 3 starts on a new pair of socks. Part of it is gauge, as I never get the exact yarn as in a pattern. Part of it is not twisting around. But once I'm started, if it's one or two stitches off, forget it. Do an extra increase or decrease when/where it's noticed. What kind of tolerances do you have on quilts? I bet everything doesn't always fit perfectly, and that you've learned what to do about mismatches that aren't much smaller than a single stitch error on a knit sock.

____________________________________________________

I can go loopy, or I can knit. Your choice.
Go to Top of Page

Calamintha
Permanent Resident

USA
2886 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2009 :  08:48:42 AM  Show Profile Send Calamintha a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The heel part of the sock is hard to visualize with just a text explanation. Any chance that you have a LYS or knitting club nearby where someone could show you what to do? Failing that I would recommend finding some pictorial or video step-by-step instructions on the web. It's just amazing to me that sock books don't do a better job illustrating the heel section. I don't know whether you are using dpns or some other technique but I found making socks with 2 circs much easier than using dpns.

Once you get the heel technique down the rest of the sock is quite easy and making your own is very satisfying. There are so many nice and interesting sock yarns around. My husband felt the same way btw. He thought it was crazy to spend more for sock yarn than you would spend to buy socks themselves but he changed his tune after I made him a pair because he discovered how much nicer handmade socks are :)
Go to Top of Page

Suzann
Seriously Hooked

USA
869 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2009 :  09:05:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit Suzann's Homepage Send Suzann a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It is frustrating. Knit your cuff again and the leg. Now before you do the heel flap insert a lifeline. Lifeline is a length of contrasting yarn a bit finer then the yarn you are using. Run it through each stitch. But not any stitch markers you might be using. After you have run the lifeline through each stitch take the thread off the needle (darning needle, not knitting needle) tie the ends of the lifeline loosely together. That way there is no change of it pulling out. If the heel doesn't turn out as you thought or you want to do it over. Just rip it out. Then pick up the stitches from your lifeline and continue. Much easier then doing the same bit of sock over and over.
Go here and watch this video on turning a sock heel. It is really helpful
http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/advanced-techniques
I watched it many times when I was first learning to knit socks. You can pause the video, knit a bit and then go back to the video.
Everyone has had headbanging experiences when they first learned to do socks. Join the crowd. hehehe sock knitting is a slippery slope. It won't be long before little balls of sock yarn are following you home. So small, so cute

Cheers and good luck

Suzann

Making cables is like making love. There is a lot of foreplay before you get to the deed

http://suzann-does-it-all.com/

Go to Top of Page

GFTC
Permanent Resident

USA
6331 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2009 :  10:25:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit GFTC's Homepage Send GFTC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by reteng
Once I finished the heel turn I discovered I had one extra stitch leftover. Not being experienced enough to problem-solve where I went wrong, I ripped out a huge chunk yet again.

As I look ahead to the directions for the gusset, I feel overwhelmed by the techniques I don't know.



When you are working the heel this is an easy way to keep track:
after you work the purl row count the stitches after the gaps at the beginning and end of the row. The numbers should match. If they don't you have done something wrong and can fix it without ripping out the whole heel.
If you count after the knit row you should have a difference of 2 stitches.

For the gusset decreases: if you are going to decrease 8 stitches (or whatever amount) on each side, put a stitch marker to mark those 8 stitches. At the end of each round make sure you have matching amounts of stitches on both gusset needles marked off by the stitch marker. That way you will know if you forgot a decrease or decreased on the wrong round.

Until you are confidant in all the techniques you will find that the more you count the less you rip and stitch markers are your friend.

You might want to knit one sock with worsted or aran weight yarn so that you get an understanding for the techniques in a fast and obvious way. It will just take a couple of hours to work the sock and will give you that AHA moment that all sock knitters need.



GFTC of NYC
my knitting photos on Flickr or Ravelry
Go to Top of Page

reteng
Warming Up

74 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2009 :  10:27:35 AM  Show Profile Send reteng a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow! You have all been so generous with your encouragement! I will definitely keep going and know I am not alone in my repeated ripping sessions. As I start these socks over, at least I am heartened by what I have already learned the hard way! Hopefully the cuff, heel flap, and turn will go more smoothly this time around. A number of you mentioned that I probably was too worried about a small error or an extra stitch. With quilting, I know which mistakes are little ones (can be "fudged" ) and which are major ones (must be ripped out.) As a first-time sock knitter, I have this to learn. I assumed one stitch too many in the heel turn would cause a big problem further on. Thank you all so much for your kind words and advice.

Go to Top of Page

YarnGoddess
Permanent Resident

USA
2460 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2009 :  10:32:41 AM  Show Profile Send YarnGoddess a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I started with "Helen's Favorite Socks", a pattern from Fiber Trends. It gave line by line, and turn by turn directions which made it easier for me to see exactly where I was going and what I'd already done. I went back to that pattern many times during my first dozen or so pairs of socks. I use Magic Loop for making socks, cos I just can't get my head around dpns. You're not alone in your frustration, we've all been there. Keep at it, you'll get it.

Elizabeth
Zipper & Diva

A sense of humor can help you tolerate the unpleasant, cope with the unexpected, overlook the unattractive and smile through the unbearable.

To learn more about healthy nutrition for your cat, go here: http://www.catnutrition.org and here: http://www.catinfo.org/
Go to Top of Page

schnitzle
New Pal

USA
17 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2009 :  9:11:14 PM  Show Profile Send schnitzle a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Starting to get the feeling you're not alone? ;)

My first pair of socks were "Fuzzy Feet" from Knitty.com
They're knit on big needles (10 1/2) and with worsted weight yarn
so it's really easy to see what you're doing. Also when I had
to rip back to fix things it was very fast to get back to
where I started. The pattern it's self is very basic.
The biggest bonus? They're felted down from humongous to slipper
size in the washer! Pretty much any small booboos like purling instead of knitting, or a k2tog to fix an extra stitch disappear!
I thought it was really a great first project.

Keep at it! Like others have said, if you have the patience and
mind to do quilting, you can definitely make socks!!

Knit happens!
Go to Top of Page

Woodstocker
New Pal

USA
5 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2009 :  03:58:31 AM  Show Profile Send Woodstocker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My first attempt to knit socks involved so much ripping out I wore out the yarn! I was using a sock yarn with #2 needles. My LYS suggested the Yankee Knitter sock pattern that offered different weights of yarn including worsted weight. Success! With fewer stiches and big yarn I only had to rip out twice before I finished my first pair.

Woodstocker
Go to Top of Page

sashers
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2009 :  04:51:52 AM  Show Profile Send sashers a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There used to be this absolutely wonderful site called Socks 101 at royea.net. I've never really had to rip back on any pairs of socks because I followed her photos. The page is down but I emailed her asking about it...maybe they'll fix it.
Go to Top of Page

knitonepurltoo
New Pal

47 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2009 :  06:24:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit knitonepurltoo's Homepage Send knitonepurltoo a Private Message  Reply with Quote
You've gotten a lot of great advice; I'd only add that I found the concepts behind the 56-stitch, 56-row sock pattern really helpful: http://www.chicknits.com/56st56rowsock.html Also, and I cannot stress this enough - you have to keep going, even if the sock looks wonky. Completing a sock will help you see how all the parts fit together, and a stitch or two here or there won't matter a bit in the end. Have fun - socks are totally worth the trouble!

Knit One, Purl Too: A Knitlog
http://www.knitonepurltoo.com
Go to Top of Page

ruthmel1
New Pal

United Kingdom
43 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2009 :  06:26:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit ruthmel1's Homepage Send ruthmel1 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
As everyone else has said you're not alone. I ripped my socks back at first several times. I couldnt get used to DPNs at all as they were like fighting with an octopus!! I used a very small addi circ. 12" I think. once I'd got used to how a sock was constructed I went back to DPN's
as for extra stitches I have them all the time. dont worry just decrease in the next round as someone else said. unless you're knitting with a very specific pattern an extra stittch wont affect the fit of the sock.
I'm lazy I do admit and I think the poor sock will be hidden by a shoe anyway!!

keep on plugging away. its very addictive

Black Cat Fibres
http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5037783
http://soxandcinders.blogspot.com/
find me on Ravelry as Cinders
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 1.06 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe