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 Knitting Machine Talk
 Mid-Gauge Machines
 Help with LK150
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SusanC
New Pal

9 Posts

Posted - 12/15/2007 :  10:17:37 PM  Show Profile Send SusanC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I just found this site. I was actually thinking of selling my knitting machine. Now I'm getting intersted again. I got frustrated because I've never actually been able to make anything on it. I've taken a few lessons and it seems easy enough while I'm sitting there but once I get home its another story. I even subscribed to knittersedge.com because they have patterns and step by step instructions but still couldn't quite get it. So what do you all think. Should I just give it up? It seems like a very steep learning curve. Thanks

Bernie
Chatty Knitter

Canada
115 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2007 :  03:19:50 AM  Show Profile Send Bernie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi: Don't give up. Believe me when I say we have all been there, at times it seemed futile. I started out with the LK150 and now have 7 machines, you can always ask people in this group for help. Even now myself and people I know who have been machine knitting for ages, still may have a glitch happen. Sometimes the problem is as simple as the yarn, or a tension issue. (or sometimes in my case- operator error) I've had weights fall on my toes, stabbed by a needle (it jumped out at me honest) I have long hair and had that caught in the carriage (now I keep my hair in a pony tail) Sometimes the air around me was a lovely shade of blue. Keep a good sense of humour and although some of the things that happened to me weren't funny at the time, when I look back I do see the humour in them. When there are days you'd like to fling the machine out the window, (believe me if it hasn't happened yet, it will) just get up and walk away from the machine.
If you need help you can post here or email me through this site.
Good luck
Bernie
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Kesdex
New Pal

17 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2007 :  09:09:39 AM  Show Profile Send Kesdex a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi,
I agree with Bernie, don't give up! I bought a LK150 this past spring. The learning curve is hard to be patient through, but SO worth it when you get past that! I wore a turtleneck sweater yesterday to work that I made in it and just finished making knit hats for my husband and step son this past week. I used a Bond Ultimate Sweater Machine for several years first, so that helped me master the LK150 faster. I find for myself, it just takes practice and simple pieces at first. I made tons of premie baby blankets at first that I donated to a local hospital. Then after that, simple scoopneck sweaters. Try a scarf so you feel like you are completing something?
Kathy
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SusanC
New Pal

9 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2007 :  8:11:27 PM  Show Profile Send SusanC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thank you for the encouragement Bernie and Kathy. I found a class that is 1 1/2 hours away for four weeks. In that time you make a sweater. So I think I'm going to take it and see if I can get past the learning curve.

Kathy, do you know where I can get some scoop neck sweater patterns for a mid guage machine? I'm assuming I have to have a pattern that doesn't have ribbing? Thanks
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Kesdex
New Pal

17 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2007 :  11:42:02 AM  Show Profile Send Kesdex a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi,
Glad to hear you found a class!

I have seen a few magazines that will put one pattern in it that has directions for handknitting and rewritten for machine. I take handknitting patterns and adapt them. I create the body of the item on the machine and then do the ribbing by hand afterwards. It's a different way of thinking, you knit it down off the bottom of the body or sleeves. And you pick up stitches around the neck and rib those. So you can do a basic sweater, with ribbing!

Lately I like the basic sweaters in Modern Classics, and "Knitter''s Handy Book of Patterns: Basic Designs in Multiple Sizes and Gauges" by Ann Budd. I also have the pattern, "The Perfect T" by Ann Norling: The Perfect T. Mostly, I have used a sweater wheel since high school for all of my sweaters. There is an on-line version at: www.knittingfool.com
Down the left-hand side you will see the link "Sweater Wheel".

Now this may sound complicated but it works well iwth the sweater wheel: I make a small swatch with my yarn on the machine, selecting different tensions on the carriage (writing them down) and do about 8-10 rows each. I take that off, tug down on it a bit to be sure the stitches are set with the size they want to be without the weights on them. I decide which "stripe" I like the best (not too tight, not too loose). I measure how many stiches in one inch (we'll say 5) and how many rows in one inch (we'll say 8) in that stripe and declare that my gauge. I then multiple that number of stitches by how big around I want my finished sweater to be: 5 x 40" = 200. Divide by 2 and that gives how many stitches I'll need for the front or back (100 in this case). I then select different Misses sizes (for a sweater for me) on the sweater wheel until I find one that asks you to cast on 100 for the back or is close to it. Sometimes I have to play around with selecting different weight yarns, even if that is not the weight I'm using. Once I find a "size" that has the stitches I need, I print it and use that with the tension settings I liked from the "stripe".

When it says to knit for 12" or make the sleeve 18", I multiple the number I got when I measured for gauge, 8, and multiple that by how long I want the piece to be (like 12") and get how many rows I need to knit on the machine.

If I want to use a pattern I find in a book, I play around with the tension settings until my gauge is what the pattern wants.

REALLY sorry if I lost you in this explaination! There are also tips in the LK-150 manual that tell how to do the scoop neck. That takes a bit of practice, I started by doing cardigans so it was always an edge to decrease, I didn't have to join a new skein or anything.

While you are taking the class, I lot of this might start to make more sense or maybe the instructor can help you adapt a hand knitting pattern for machine!

Good Luck! Let us know how the class goes!

Kathy
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SusanC
New Pal

9 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2008 :  7:22:46 PM  Show Profile Send SusanC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thank you, kathy for so much information. I won't be able to take the class this time so will have to wait for it to be scheduled again. In the meanwhile, I'm just going to try to do some things to get to know the machine better. And I will definitely check out the web site and the video that came with the machine. Susan
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Kesdex
New Pal

17 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2008 :  08:30:34 AM  Show Profile Send Kesdex a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I hope you are able to get enough from the video and practicing that you surprise yourself and don't need to take the class!
Kathy
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Sandejc
New Pal

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 11/24/2008 :  7:47:04 PM  Show Profile Send Sandejc a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hello,
Recently joined as I just purchased a LK150 and am looking for an instruction video to use in my vcr. Found on a site but price is $50, which seems a little high. Please let me know how you have been doing on your LK150 as you have now had it for a while. I agree, learning curve seems difficult but am hoping to learn lots, thanks. Sande
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BeckyG81
New Pal

USA
5 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2009 :  1:38:11 PM  Show Profile Send BeckyG81 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Sandejc asked about Silver Reed LK150 videos. I found a couple of videos.

http://www.needle-tek.com/products/parts.html

Click the "Assorted Stuff" tab. The site does not state whether the "VIDEO LK-150" is VHS or DVD ($49.95). The "LK-150 Knitting Machine Workshop" and "Intro to Machine Knitting" DVDs are available for $32.00 each.

Below is another option. Per the Knitting Today web site, "This DVD used to be included in the LK-150 box as a VHS. When distributorship changed, the inclusion of this valuable resource was stopped." $34.95

http://www.knittingtoday.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=KT&Product_Code=90147

I hope this helps! I ran across these videos while searching. I just bought an LK150, so I am looking for videos, too.

A great FREE resource to use is your local public library system. I reserved 4 machine knitting books to pick up next week. The books are pretty recently published (1990s to present). I hope the books have good patterns.
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BAStinson
New Pal

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  12:32:01 PM  Show Profile Send BAStinson a Private Message  Reply with Quote
have lk150 machine where do I start

Barbara Stinson
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betts_01@comcast.net


Posts

Posted - 02/25/2011 :  10:05:41 AM  Show Profile Send betts_01@comcast.net a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi, I'm sitting at my machine right now. It's the 1st time I've been able to keep a piece of stockinette going!

What's the best way to join a new ball of yarn? To be specific, my current ball is about to run out. All I want to do is end this one without things unraveling & and replace it with my 2nd ball.

Thanks!
Betts
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cn1793@coastalnet.com
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2011 :  04:55:26 AM  Show Profile Send cn1793@coastalnet.com a Private Message  Reply with Quote
@Betts and anyone else who wonders how to join a new ball of yarn:

The two ways I prefer (and YMMV) are the Russian join, for relatively thin or lofty yarn, and joining a new ball at the beginning of a row for all other yarns.

The Russian join is illustrated here, http://www.knittinganyway.com/freethings/russianjoin.htm, or you can search for instructions or a YouTube video.

To join a new ball at the beginning of a row, just drop the "old" yarn at the end of a row and start the next row with the new yarn threaded into the carriage. Sometimes you might have a fairly long strand of the "old" yarn to weave into the seam. I have found that if the remaining yarn is as long as 3x the width of the fabric on the needles, it will knit another row. If not, better to change yarns.

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hilarysmum
New Pal

France
4 Posts

Posted - 10/26/2011 :  01:10:23 AM  Show Profile Send hilarysmum a Private Message  Reply with Quote
OK I have to ask, why cant I just join it with a tight knot? I use cones so never had this problem. Just curious.
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Shalee
Permanent Resident

USA
2041 Posts

Posted - 11/25/2011 :  10:18:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Shalee's Homepage Send Shalee a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi, hilarysmum, I had to smile at your question. I haven't had a machine for a long time, as I gave mine away several years ago. It was a different model & manufacturer.

If you make a knot in the yarn I would wonder if it would travel through the mechanism easily or get stuck. It really would be best, in my humble opinion, to just start a new skein at the beginning of a row.

I am currently looking at the LK 150 but haven't made up my mind yet. Having previously had a full set up I found that I really don't want or need everything now. The LK 150 would be more for the plain knitting that takes so much time. I still would do the socks, fair isle, cables, etc. by hand and enjoy every minute of it. After all, Christmas is comming and I haven't decided what to buy for myself!

Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!


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