Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: Always know how much yarn you need
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 Knitting Talk
 General Technique Questions
 Teaching others
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

mkfromKansas
Chatty Knitter

339 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2011 :  08:35:12 AM  Show Profile Send mkfromKansas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I live on campus of a retirement center and go over to the main bldg to visit others, always taking my knitting with me. Some of the women would like me to teach them how to knit. Sorrowfully, some of those are a "little fuzzy" in remembering how-to-do things. My question to you all is - do any of you remember a little poem/saying about "round the tree and down the bunny hole" in teaching children how to knit? I think it would help them remember if they had some sort reference system.

knits_for_preemies
Permanent Resident

USA
1957 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2011 :  11:03:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit knits_for_preemies's Homepage Send knits_for_preemies a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi, I've worked with children and adults, particularly "older" adults...yes, some of them do have problems remembering the steps and remembering them in the correct order.

I'm not familiar with the "bunny hole" rhyme, but I use this one and it works well for the knit stitch:

In through the front door,
Go around back.
Peek through the window,
Off jumps Jack.


Getting them to say it aloud as they work with you is key...also one on one is pretty much essential. So you might want to solicit some extra help if you are trying to teach more than one.

There is a rhyme for the purl stitch too, but I don't have that one committed to memory...I'll see if I can find it and come back here with that one as well.

Happy knitting,
Barbara

Ravelry Name: KnitsForPreemies
http://www.ravelry.com/projects/KnitsforPreemies
www.southernfriedknittin.blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page

knits_for_preemies
Permanent Resident

USA
1957 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2011 :  11:06:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit knits_for_preemies's Homepage Send knits_for_preemies a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here's the purl stitch rhyme:

Under the fence,
Catch the sheep,
Back we go,
Off we leap.


I can't remember where I found these two rhymes, but thanks to whomever came up with them. I'm pretty sure the knit rhyme is a very old one.

Hope this helps too.

Barbara

Ravelry Name: KnitsForPreemies
http://www.ravelry.com/projects/KnitsforPreemies
www.southernfriedknittin.blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page

ikkivan
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
544 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2011 :  3:43:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit ikkivan's Homepage Send ikkivan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm going to jump in here with a question of my own ... I was searching for the "right" place to ask when I discovered this topic.

Does anyone have experience teaching knitting to someone with dyslexia? I also teach beginning knitting skills to some mature women and teens, and the one (67 years old) with dyslexia is really struggling. She has become an inspiration to me because of her determination, though. I've been teaching most of them the English method (I knit both ways), but this woman immediately wound her working yarn in her left fingers because she remembered her grandmother knitting that way, so we went with the continental method for her. However, she has a REALLY difficult time, plus just cannot seem to work the purl stitch at all. So now I'm wondering if (no matter how much she thinks she wants to knit like her grandmother) perhaps the English method would be easier for her.

She has read Debbie Macomber's books and knows Debbie is dyslexic. I contacted DM's office and heard back from an assistant that Debbie knits English method, so I'm going to share that with my friend.

I'm just desperately searching for ideas on how to present knitting to her in words and demonstrations that will "register" in her mind. I'd be most grateful for any help, because I certainly have no training for this challenge!

Donna, with intentions always bigger than her available time.
Go to Top of Page

Janettoo
Warming Up

64 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2011 :  7:25:40 PM  Show Profile Send Janettoo a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm a bit dyslexic myself, and I taught my very dyslexic daughter to knit. I didn't do anything special.

I also taught some teens and adults at my son's school (a theraputic school for "quirky" kids) to knit. Some were dyslexic or "slow learners". Others were faculty or parents. What I do is to explain that there are various ways of holding and moving to accomplish knitting; each has advantages and disadvantages. Then I teach English knitting. After they can do a knit stitch reliably (usually withing 1/2 hour), I teach Continental. Usually, there is an immediate preference. Most of the time it is for Continental, especially if the learner has ever crocheted. Once in a while they prefer English. By then it is time to end the session. I have them practice just the knit stitch, however they choose to do it, until the next session. I also hand out illustrated print-outs of how to form the stitch and a few sites with videos.

When I then teach purling to the Continental knitters, I discuss "proper" and backwards (ie. combined) purling, the plusses and minuses of each.

Dyslexia alone should not be a barrier. However, dyslexia is often comorbid with language processing problems, fine motor problems, executive function issues, sequencing, memory, and other issues. Also, sometimes people who have general cognitive deficiencies prefer to think of themselves as dyslexic rather than mildly retarded. So there may be a lot else going on with this woman. Doesn't mean she can't learn; just that it may take her longer.

One further thought. My daughter has difficulty with some motor skill learning. She was a total klutz at folk dancing, but finally was able to learn some when her instructor got behind her and moved her through the steps. So you might have your pupil put her hands on top of your hands and FEEL knitting. Her fingers on top of each of your fingers, maybe yarn wrapped around her fingers as well as yours. Also, if she is watching you, she needs to be next to you and not across from you. Across means she has to mentally rotate everything, which can be confusing when moving left or right is an issue.

Janet in TN
Go to Top of Page

ikkivan
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
544 Posts

Posted - 01/24/2011 :  07:35:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit ikkivan's Homepage Send ikkivan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Janet, thank you SO much! Those definitely are some concrete ideas I can try. From what I'm reading, I do understand that this will just take more time, which I'm willing to give. I do tell her to just keep working at it to find her own best way.

I've also read that many dyslexics may have problems tracking with their eyes, which I think may be the case for this woman. When she makes a mistake, she cannot seem to "see" it and is at a loss as to what to do about it.

We'll keep plugging along. She has begged me not to "give up" on her and I've promised I won't.

Donna, with intentions always bigger than her available time.
Go to Top of Page

lacylaine
Seriously Hooked

USA
993 Posts

Posted - 02/02/2011 :  3:41:46 PM  Show Profile Send lacylaine a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Good for you, Donna! What a lovely gift you are giving this woman! And thank you, Janet for your tips. I've often been asked to show someone how to knit. Like others, I try to emphasize that there is no "right way" to do it but I'm often stumped as to how I can show them in a different way than I already have. I like the hands on top of mine concept.

Melanie

"Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might." Ecclesiastes 9:10

2010 FO: two pair felted clogs, two chemo caps for Mom 2011 FO: BYOB (market bag), Hedgerow Mitts, pair of wristers/sweatbands, Baby Alpaca Grande Vest




Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.58 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe