Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: Celebrating Texas fiber producers
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 Tool Talk
 Gadgets
 Kitchen scale
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 3

Clara
queen bee

USA
4403 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2010 :  5:59:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Have you ever used a kitchen scale to figure out how much yarn is in a skein? Or to divide a skein evenly in two? If not, you may be interested in this week's review of a simple, lightweight digital kitchen scale that does the trick.
...Here tis

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher

GFTC
Permanent Resident

USA
6331 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2010 :  6:49:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit GFTC's Homepage Send GFTC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Great topic. I have a Salter digital scale and it hasn't seen the kitchen in a long time.

I'm just about done with the Rambling Rows afghan which is made with 3 different sizes of mitered squares. I can tell you that in Mission Falls 1824 Cotton (50g skeins) the small square takes 10g, the rectangle takes 20g, and the large square takes 40g. Yardage? What's that?

Last summer I knit a mitered square blanket with 14" squares that were striped. I knit one square and then frogged it and weighed the yarn for each stripe. Having that info enabled me to make full use of the skeins and never have to join yarn in the middle of a stripe, thus eliminating extra ends to bury.

In those cases the scale is much easier and faster than using a yarn meter for yardage. Probably more accurate for the purpose, too.

GFTC of NYC
my knitting photos on Flickr or Ravelry
Go to Top of Page

anderknit
Permanent Resident

USA
2602 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2010 :  7:01:14 PM  Show Profile Send anderknit a Private Message  Reply with Quote
All three of the knitters in this family are always using the "kitchen" scale (which has never been in the kitchen) to weigh yarn. I love love love it.

"Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.' "
Go to Top of Page

Jane
SustaYning Member

USA
4388 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2010 :  7:04:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Jane's Homepage Send Jane a Private Message  Reply with Quote
How did you know I had just decided to replace the old scale I've had since they invented yarn? You're spooky, Clara! I need one right away!

Jane

Betty needs a warm hat: Support KR
Blog: Not Plain Jane
Photos: My Flickr Album
Go to Top of Page

Bonstrick
New Pal

USA
15 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2010 :  9:22:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bonstrick's Homepage  Send Bonstrick a Yahoo! Message Send Bonstrick a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have a Wt Watchers digital scale and i have used it more often for my yarn than for my diets. Using my scale has helped me many times but I always have to really think it through slowly to figure it out because math is not my best subject. You have explained it so clearly in this weeks issue I just know I will never have trouble again.

Thank you again Clara for making the process so clear!
Go to Top of Page

sockjoan
Warming Up

Australia
59 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  12:34:04 AM  Show Profile Send sockjoan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I use my kitchen scales far more often for yarn and knitting than for cooking; extremely useful! If you want to dye yarn or fibres, you need to know the weight of these before you can mix the right amount of dye. And, of course, if you want to post your handknits to your nearest and dearest, the kitchen scales help you work out the economics of that exercise.
I spin as well, so being able to weigh my yarns (or fibres before spinning) is kinda vital, as they don't come in standard-sized packages!
Go to Top of Page

kkehrig
New Pal

7 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  03:16:30 AM  Show Profile Send kkehrig a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Instead of doing the math on paper as you suggest, I use an artist's proportion wheel. Aligning the full skein weight with the remaining skein weight, it tells me not only the percentage of yarn I have left, but also the number of yards. A proportion wheel is also handy for resizing garments and recipes. See one here:

http://www.amazon.com/Staedtler-Mars-Proportion-Scale-Wheel/dp/B0014BA2UC
Go to Top of Page

hillstreetmama
Permanent Resident

USA
3448 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  04:09:09 AM  Show Profile Send hillstreetmama a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I've used my scale for all the things listed in the review. SOOO many times, at the LYS, I've wished they had a scale there, so I finally donated my old one to the store. There are a lot of store samples that list the yarn and the pattern, but not the yardage. People would ask, "Did it take 2 or 3 skeins for this hat/scarf/whatever?" If I don't know or can't remember, onto the scale it goes. "It looks like it took about 2 1/4 skeins." Better than saying, well, I THINK it took only two, and after she drives 50 miles back home, she find herself short that 1/4 skein.

Clara, thank you for reminding everyone of this very handy tool!

Jan
Go to Top of Page

fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  04:25:48 AM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I find it easy to use old fashioned ratio and proportion to figure the math. Easy because I can remember it better than a formula. It is:
the weight of the skein is to the length of the skein as the weight of my leftovers is to the length of my leftovers. x becomes the one factor I don't know. Now multiply the two out side numbers which equal the two inner numbers when they are multiplied. find the value of x and you have it. For example:
50gm : 200yds :: 30 gm : xyds
50 x = 6000
x=`120

50 x equals the outside numbers multiplied and 6000 equals the inside numbers multiplied.

fran

fran

http://martianmischief.blogspot.com/
Go to Top of Page

knitz2
Permanent Resident

USA
1800 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  05:49:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit knitz2's Homepage Send knitz2 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I currently use a postal scale for my yarn & fo weighings. Previously used a dieter's scale but it did a lot I didn't need so when kitchen scale showed up on dil's Christmas wish list, I bought myself the less expensive postal scale and gave dil the fancy one.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass ...
.....it's learning how to dance in the rain!
Come visit me at http://yarnbasket.wordpress.com
Go to Top of Page

ConnieHere
New Pal

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  05:56:44 AM  Show Profile Send ConnieHere a Private Message  Reply with Quote
We have had a scale for several years, but it is not as accurate as the digital ones. Dear husband suggested last year that we buy a digital one and we did and now I don't know how I lived without it! I'm constantly weighing those last little bits of yarn I have left over and marking it on the ball band that I keep with the yarn.
Good suggestion, too, to keep track of yarns you've used and for what project.

cg
Go to Top of Page

socker
Chatty Knitter

258 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  06:02:23 AM  Show Profile Send socker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
When I had to move to my desert island (ok, it's a small room in a home in the US that I'm sharing with husbeast and the dogs) one of the things I packed was my digital cooking scale - so I could weigh my yarn. I've used it enough to pay for it's space.
Go to Top of Page

GFTC
Permanent Resident

USA
6331 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  06:10:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit GFTC's Homepage Send GFTC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ravelry is an easy way to keep track of yarn leftovers from projects if you've entered the yarn into your stash page and then linked your project to the yarn. When the project is done weigh the remaining yarn and enter the amount actually used on your project page. Ravelry will calculate the weight and yardage that you still own.

GFTC of NYC
my knitting photos on Flickr or Ravelry
Go to Top of Page

needler
New Pal

27 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  06:41:50 AM  Show Profile Send needler a Private Message  Reply with Quote
knitz2 brought this up: I currently use a postal scale for my yarn & fo weighings."
I wish (talking about Ravelry here) more people would weigh and post FO weight in their projects. I have started doing this in my own notes and it helps in many different ways.
needler
Go to Top of Page

lacylaine
Seriously Hooked

USA
993 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  06:53:49 AM  Show Profile Send lacylaine a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow, what a timely subject, in so many ways! First, when I changed my e-mail address earlier this year, I came directly to KR to update my profile. Well, I don't know why, but this is only my second week receiving my newsletter!

Second, I recently called in the pros to fix multiple dry wall dings and scrapes and repaint our family room (and several others). Our family room is where I keep my stash and I have outgrown my space ever since I bought enough yarn to make the whole family sweaters.

So, I just bought some sweater size Space Bags and filled up all three of them just last night. Thank you, Clara and GFTC, for making me realize I can do a bit more before they get the air sucked out of them on Saturday.

I will go to Ravelry today and start posting my yarn. (And yes, I only joined Ravelry in the last few months!)

All in all, a very good time for me to start receiving my newsletter again!

Melanie

P.S. I've had a kitchen scale for many years and it also works well for making bread! You'll get much more consistent results using weight instead of cups.

"Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might." Ecclesiastes 9:10

FO 2009: small market/shower bag; gray watch cap; magic square potholder; five dish cloths, including two new patterns; Hedgerow Mitts! 2010: two pair felted clogs, pink chemo cap for Mom




Go to Top of Page

cpknits
Chatty Knitter

USA
300 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  06:59:32 AM  Show Profile Send cpknits a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I was lost when my first kitchen scale stopped working. I fretted until I replaced it. While I use it mostly for yarn, I find it very handy for measuring pasta portions. I was always making way too much pasta until I started weighing. I'm also going to order one of those proportion wheels as part of my next Amason order. I have a hard time resisting useful gadgets. Great article!

Carol, Wisconsin
Go to Top of Page

aprilshowers
Chatty Knitter

295 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  07:07:44 AM  Show Profile Send aprilshowers a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I laughed when I saw your review as I have the leftover sock yarn from some socks I finished last night sitting on the scale right here on my desk. I would be lost without my scale!

________________________________________________
Photos: http://flickr.com/photos/7419094@N02/sets/72157600168327475/
Ravelry: http://www.ravelry.com/projects/aprilshowers
Go to Top of Page

NutmegOwl
Gabber Extraordinaire

581 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  07:57:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit NutmegOwl's Homepage Send NutmegOwl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes, yes and yes - I take this one step farther for optimal yarn usage. I weigh my yarn before I start knitting with it to help make those numbers more exact. Some indie yarns are very generous with yardage, and it helps to know that. Other companies less so. And it makes your calculation of remaining yardage that much more precise.

As for division for two identical items, I'll chime in to say putting a yarn cake on a CD spindle and working from both ends RULES. Whether you're working 2-at-a-time on one circular or knitting sleeves flat, the cake stays tidy and untangled and your yardage is identical.

-----
Nutmeg Owl
Quaecumque sunt vera
http://www.owlwaysknitting.wordpress.com
Go to Top of Page

churchlady
Warming Up

Canada
81 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  09:19:35 AM  Show Profile Send churchlady a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Just like Marge Simpson, since meeting Homer 30 years ago "I've never been able to use the calculus I encounter in my everyday life." In fact, I'm very glad you showed the math, so I don't have to e-mail my son to solve this knitting math, as usual.

Using the scale to divide a skein of sock yarn in half, and working toe-up, makes sure no precious hand-dyed art is wasted. But having started the sock-yarn blankie with scrap sock yarn (see my ravelry page and the "blankiemania" group), I use my scale to make up 10g or 20g mini-skeins to trade with others in the group.
Go to Top of Page

Luann
Permanent Resident

USA
2670 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  09:38:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Luann's Homepage Send Luann a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Use my digital kitchen scale all the time for dividing skeins and checking to see if I have enough to finish. Also use it to weigh items for the mail.

About the only time I use it for cooking is to weigh dough, esp. to see if the two halves are the same for a two-crust pie.

Great article!
Luann

Knit and let knit!
http://www.luannocracy.blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page

Bluestockingknits
New Pal

USA
46 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2010 :  11:45:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bluestockingknits's Homepage Send Bluestockingknits a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I LOVE this! We use a scale every day at the shop. Sometimes people have finished 1 sock and are thinking they might not have enough left for the other sock. While grabbing the scale we get wondering looks but then grateful looks when we get the answer. Be even more nerdy and weigh it in grams. Lots of yarn comes in 50gm balls or 100 gm balls. So just figure it out the same way Clara so beautifully explained plugging in grams instead of oz. There are 448 gm in one pound, 112 in 4 oz.
Just weighing in with my 2 cents.

Happy Knitting! Karen

The webbe of life is a tangled yarn. William Shakespeare

http://www.stringtheoryyarn.com
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 3 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 1.02 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe