Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: Always know how much yarn you need
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 General Chitchat
 Completion Issues?
 finishing/stitching up
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

sktknit48
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  08:29:45 AM  Show Profile Send sktknit48 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm having trouble with finishing. I do a killer mattress stitch-that's not the problem-but my set in sleeves are never as neat as I would like. My New Year's resolution is to finally learn to set in a sleeve properly. it kills me that even though I have been knitting for years, I still struggle in this area. I was wondering if there is a book, article, or video that someone could recommend that deals with this area of finishing. My reference books are not very detailed in the set in sleeve area....some as vague as "set in the sleeve"..... I know there are good instructions out there but I haven't located them. Does someone have a favorite method?
Sue


marjotse
Permanent Resident

Sweden
1018 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  09:05:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit marjotse's Homepage Send marjotse a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have never seen a good website but what I do is block the pieces of the garment and then seam the shoulders and sides of a sweater both body and sleeve first using the mattress stitch. Then I slide the sleevecap in the sleeve and use a lot of pins to pin it neatly to the main body. I use a backstitch from the wrong side to seam the sleeve to the main body. The back stitch I use is a normal sewing back stitch (see e.g. this tutorial http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n04lLVqOEjA ) and I try to stitch small stitches. This works fine for me, the main thing is to block and use loads of pins...

Marjolein

my photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/98299499@N00/
www.ravelry.com/projects/marjotse
Go to Top of Page

NutmegOwl
Gabber Extraordinaire

582 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  10:07:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit NutmegOwl's Homepage Send NutmegOwl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I do not block, but I do mark/match up the centers and any other relevant points (where BOs occur). Then I CROCHET the sleeve into the body. This produces a flexible yet strong seam that is not bulky. Depending on the gauge of the garment, I will crochet at a ratio of every-other stitch or stitch-2-skip-1. This method makes it easy to flip over to see how you've done, and works especially well of there is real "easing" to do, for example, when the top of the sleeve looks to be shorter than the garment hole.

-----
Nutmeg Owl
Quaecumque sunt vera
http://www.owlwaysknitting.wordpress.com
Go to Top of Page

knitree
Seriously Hooked

688 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2010 :  07:36:57 AM  Show Profile Send knitree a Private Message  Reply with Quote
At this year's Knitter's Review retreat, Anne Hanson gave us this tip for set-in sleeves: add your ease at both the top and the bottom of the sleeve, with the sides laying flat (stitch-for-stitch) with the body of the garment. The reason for this: top ease is obvious - shoulder rounding, bottom ease - creates a bit of room for breasts thus reducing pull across the chest. I plan to try this on my next sweater.

Tree
Taking simple patterns and complicating them...
Go to Top of Page

Ceil
Permanent Resident

USA
1814 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2010 :  07:52:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ceil's Homepage Send Ceil a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm about to work "set-in" sleeves from shoulder to wrist, using a Cowichan method described in "Knitting in the Old Way" by Priscilla Gibson-Roberts. She describes two methods there, in fact. I'll let you know how it goes. Might be a couple days.

Ceil

Time is never a factor when joy is involved.
Go to Top of Page

fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2010 :  04:23:02 AM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I divide my sleeve caps into 4ths and mark them with pins, then divide the armhole into 4ths and mark them also. Then I match up the pins and ease the two pieces together. I baste them with about 1/2 inch stitches places about an inch back from the edge and remove all the pins. Now I take these basted sleeve insertions and carefully stitch them into place with a stitch in every stitch and row, usually either the mattress stitch or the "baseball" stitch. Once in place, I remove the bastings and I'm finished.

fran

http://martianmischief.blogspot.com/
Go to Top of Page

La galloise
Chatty Knitter

France
163 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  05:00:17 AM  Show Profile Send La galloise a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I hate stitching up and always feel it lets the knitting down,but I have just finished "a top -> down" sweater.........no seaming and I'm delighted with it.
Now I only have to find enough patterns I like in this method and I'll be a happy knitter!!
Mary
Go to Top of Page

fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  10:30:37 AM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Mary,

I knit almost all of my sweaters using the top down method. There are basic patterns for top down pullovers and cardigans on my blog toward the beginning and there are companies that sell only that type of pattern. I'm thinking, but may be slightly off, of cottage creations and pure and simple for a few. Just put knit top down sweater patterns into google and you will have more than you can handle.

fran

http://martianmischief.blogspot.com/
Go to Top of Page

La galloise
Chatty Knitter

France
163 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  3:23:39 PM  Show Profile Send La galloise a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Fran,
Thankyou so much for the information,I'll be sure to look at your blog as soon as log off here. I have really enjoyed knitting my first top down sweater.
Mary
Go to Top of Page

Carol
New Pal

USA
17 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2010 :  04:19:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carol's Homepage Send Carol a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I finish all my seams with mattress stitch, also, including setting in my sleeves. It works beautifully, from the right side, and is easy to execute. It makes for a very flat seam with no bulk. I simply pin the center of the sleeve cap to the shoulder seam. It is easier for me to work if I place it flat on a table to do the seam. There is a small amount of ease to work in, but it's very easy to do.

I work 1/2 stitch into the armhole and go under a full stitch on the sleeve. Every once in a while I'll go under more than one row on the armhole.

I hope you'll try it and let us know how it works for you.

Carol in St. Louis
Today is a gift - that's why it's called the Present :)
Go to Top of Page

sktknit48
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2010 :  07:35:28 AM  Show Profile Send sktknit48 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I've been busy trying all these wonderful suggestions..as luck would have it, I have several ready to sew up garments that were stalled because of the sleeve seaming. I learned from each one and I made notes in my knitting journal so I would have them handy.
The one that I did the best on was Carol's suggestion to mattress seam from the right side but each idea had it's merits. So...what I took from all this is if one method doesn't look as good as I would like, undo it and try a different method. A lot depends on type of yarn and pattern stitch. I love that I now have an arsenal of ways to insert my sleeve. By the way, I do love top down but find that at some point the bulk of the knitting gets uncomfortable for my arthritic fingers. much easier for me to knit sections. By the way, if you are the Carol from Shelda's old group, I have a whole file of tips from you. You have made me a much better knitter. Thank you and thanks to all who helped me with this!
Sue
Go to Top of Page

Fairfield Beach
New Pal

16 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2010 :  09:01:01 AM  Show Profile Send Fairfield Beach a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I bought some of those tiny little hair clips at a Dollar store and they work great for holding the seams together instead of pins. The ones I found aren't quite a half inch long, plastic with the 'claws' that grab the knitting or hair depending on your use!! 24 on a card for a dollar. I've seen soemthing similiar sold for knitting at a frightening price! And lately I've been having alot of luck with a crocheted seam. It's flexible and holds the knitting together more evenly. It stretches nicely if you don't do it too tightly, which I think is an important feature.
Go to Top of Page

needler
New Pal

27 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2010 :  5:07:02 PM  Show Profile Send needler a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A tip to help manage ease: baste (using contrast color, "slippery" yarn--mercerized cotton crochet thread is great if you have it) along the edge where the seam will be. You can pull this thread, pulling the sleeve edge in to fit the armhole. You can see exactly where the extra ease will be. Attach sleeve with basting in place, then remove the basting thread. Pinning first, as previously suggested is a good idea.
needler
Go to Top of Page

GFTC
Permanent Resident

USA
6331 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2010 :  1:23:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit GFTC's Homepage Send GFTC a Private Message  Reply with Quote
File this under learn something new every day. Thanks ladies!

I read this thread and tried to memorize it because there are so many good tips about my most dreaded part of knitting which is sewing in set-in sleeves.

I'm OK with stockinette but last night I had to sew in set-in sleeves on an aran cardigan - each sleeve has a diamond cable surrounded by a braided cable and a wrap cable on a ground of Irish moss stitch and each one ends at a different spot on the sleeve edge. Luckily I thought to knit a selvedge stitch on each side of the sleeve.

After several tries I realized it wasn't going to work by my usual pinning method so I checked here and voila! baste the sleeve first. I used a length of some bright colored Sugar "n Cream (sweater is dark gray wool) and basted the sleeve to the armhole. Immediately the curve became apparent and guided me into easing the thing together.

I started sewing at center top, sewed down one side, and then went back and sewed down the other side and it really worked out great.

So glad I noticed this thread.

GFTC of NYC
my knitting photos on Flickr or Ravelry
Go to Top of Page

cpknits
Chatty Knitter

USA
300 Posts

Posted - 01/20/2010 :  10:47:08 AM  Show Profile Send cpknits a Private Message  Reply with Quote
This is a great thread, thanks! I've been using more of a peasant, squared type of set in sleeve because I have had a lot of difficulty with set-in cap type sleeves. I have some bulky yarn left and have been avoiding knitting a sweater from it because those seams always seem to come out so ugly. I have one sweater I am going to rip back and re-knit and I'll give it one more try as I absolutely love the red Katia wool I used. I occasionally bought bulky yarn because I loved the color/texture even though I'm not a bulky fan. I do like top down but found that I prefer a sewn side seam for bulkier yarns. I have done a "fake" seam for those but it doesn't seem the same, especially for DH's sweaters as he is 6"6" and the size seems to scream for sturdy seams. Thanks again!

Carol, Wisconsin
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.47 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe