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~bananaKnits~
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
516 Posts

Posted - 07/14/2006 :  3:23:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit ~bananaKnits~'s Homepage  Send ~bananaKnits~ a Yahoo! Message Send ~bananaKnits~ a Private Message
I have problems with my right thumb and wrist, so for me the garter stitch on smaller needles feels more comfortable, funny that when you mentioned

"I have learned that big needles and/or lots of ribbing aggravate the carpel tunnel"

I have found this also, you are the first person to have had the same experience. People think I'm weird because I pick projects like Hanne Falkenberg's Mermaid, which has lots of stitches fingering weight yarn and size 3 needles all garter stitch.

All the pain is worth it. I love to knit....

Happy Knitting,

ana


http://bananaknits.blogspot.com/

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PamelaA3
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
476 Posts

Posted - 07/15/2006 :  2:55:41 PM  Show Profile Send PamelaA3 a Private Message
Considering that you mom has this problem also, and seeing her pain, it might be worth exploring all knitting styles and find which one gives you the least problems. You are young enough to try to make a change if it would help.

You said your mom had surgery 30 years ago. Techniques have greatly improved in since then. They can now do lapriscopic with only 2 - 1/2 inch incisions. Recovery is still several months but I am told the pain is not as bad. But I can't speak from experience on that one. Chicken here is still holding off on surgery. I just might have to buy another brace soon. This one is getting a little worn.

Ana, explore what exactly give you the numbness and pain. You may find that other styles of knitting help and only certain techniques are causing the problem.

Take Care,
Pam
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PBELKNAP
Permanent Resident

USA
1136 Posts

Posted - 07/17/2006 :  05:57:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit PBELKNAP's Homepage Send PBELKNAP a Private Message
Can I ask a silly question...how does one hold the yarn in one's left hand? For the usual English style, I weave the yarn between my fingers. I can't seem to figure out, though, the optimal way to hold it for the left. I tried doing my usual weaving technique, but it doesn't seem to work as well for the left hand.

PAM
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Momma78239
Permanent Resident

USA
4859 Posts

Posted - 07/17/2006 :  09:23:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Momma78239's Homepage  Send Momma78239 a Yahoo! Message Send Momma78239 a Private Message
I hold the yarn in my left hand. I weave it right through the fingers palm side of little finger, back of ring finger, palm of middle finger, outside of first finger. It also angles. so that at the pinky it's right next to the palm, and by the time it comes over the pointer finger, it's up at the tip.

-WendyM[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v632/Momma78239/smallspindlepic.gif[/IMG]
And all the women that were wise hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, both of blue, and of purple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen. Exodus 35:25
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nerissa
Chatty Knitter

263 Posts

Posted - 07/17/2006 :  10:28:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit nerissa's Homepage Send nerissa a Private Message
I was taught to knit Continental and I still knit that way, though I taught myself to knit English as well. Sometimes I'll switch to English if my left hand hurts, and of course it's good for two-fisted Fair Isle.

I'm one of those pseudo-Continental knitters that does a little finger throw instead of picking the yarn with the needle.

When I hold the yarn in my left hand, I usually wrap it twice around my pinky and then up and over the pointer finger.

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gwtreece
Permanent Resident

USA
7254 Posts

Posted - 07/17/2006 :  10:53:08 AM  Show Profile  Send gwtreece a Yahoo! Message Send gwtreece a Private Message
I wrap it around my pinky and them it next to the palm, comes between the middle finger and over the pointer finger. That is how I hold the yarn in my left hand.

Wanda
My Blog
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Dspen89
Chatty Knitter

330 Posts

Posted - 07/19/2006 :  11:27:06 PM  Show Profile Send Dspen89 a Private Message
I was a crocheter first, so holding yarn in my left hand felt natural then. But when it came to knitting I was a mess! It just "feels" more natural throwing.

The motion of it is mesmerizing to me and relaxing. I'm a tight crocheter and knitter (at least I know to always go up a needle/hook size )so I never have a "loose" tension problem, usually the opposite happens for me so I relax and go with it.

I think no matter how you do it, as long as you enjoy what you're doing and it works for you - it's all good!

Dawn
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Flossie
Warming Up

USA
64 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2006 :  3:09:23 PM  Show Profile Send Flossie a Private Message
Continental for me.

(Saga of my journey on the road to learning – feel free to skip this part.
My home ec teacher in 7th grade taught us to knit using the continental method. Since I already crocheted it was fine with me. After I finished the class I went back to crochet. Years later when I decided I wanted to knit an afghan, I needed to relearn knitting.

I asked around but everyone knitted so strangely. They kept dropping the needle, picking up the yarn, dropping the yarn… ???. So I bought a book The Harmony Guide to Knitting and discovered that the way I had been taught was called continental and everyone else was knitting variations of English. I figured out most of what I had forgotten from the book, except my purls ...

So my purl stitches were all twisted. I just called it “my design” and when the afghan was finished I went back to crochet. So many yummy stitches to learn.

True, that knitted afghan was so much nicer to snuggle in than my crochet afghans. It was more stretchy and not as heavy.

Then I came across some nice yarn. This yarn was Big Buck$ and crocheting takes so much more yarn than knitting. Now, those crossed purls were a problem, I wanted to learn to knit some pretty pattern stitches to go with my oh so pretty yarn. I found someone at a LYS who was willing to help me. She watched me for 20 seconds and said. You are wrapping the yarn backwards. ??What?? Was that all?

It did take a while to unlearn the wrong wrap and relearn the right one – it was awkward at first and probably why so many people don’t care for continental. But perseverance paid off and with a little coaxing from my right index finger and left thumb the purls became easier until now I can do it all with a little flick of the wrist. No CTS yet.
End of saga.)

One difference between English and continental that I’ve noticed is that I love doing seed stitch and several of the throwers I know hate it. It is so easy to switch back and forth between knit and purl in the continental method. I am knitting a lot of lace this summer and find the yos and ssk etc to be easy in continental.

Another difference, I think throw knitters have an easier time with tension because the wrapping motion is the tensioning device for them. For pickers, it is the pull on the yarn when the stitch is finished. This past spring I finally learned how to feel the tension in my purls so that they match my knits. A little more tension on the yarn before beginning the next stitch pulls the yarn closer to the needle and keeps the stitches even. It’s habit now.

When I get around to learning stranded 2 color, I may have to revisit this topic.

Whew, I do go on a bit about some things.


Flossie in SD
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PamelaA3
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
476 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2006 :  1:15:18 PM  Show Profile Send PamelaA3 a Private Message
HI Flossie,

I am very interested in your post. Perhaps you can answer a few questions for me. I can knit continental. Like you, I learned to crochet first, so it was easy when I tried it. However, I had learned to knit English style first. My problem is that I have not seen anyone do the yarn overs and increases with continental. Is there a book that has these techniques with drawings? Presently, I use continental just for yards of stockinette. Also, do you find that you knit looser or need to size down the needles when you do continental? Thanks for any input.

Pam
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Flossie
Warming Up

USA
64 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2006 :  3:43:04 PM  Show Profile Send Flossie a Private Message
Hey Pam,

YO - exactly like a knit stitch EXCEPT I don't use any of the stitches from the left needle. In other words, when you do a knit stitch you insert the right needle into the left needle's stitch (knitwise), then wrap the yarn on the right needle and pull it back through the left needle's stitch, finally you slide the old stitch off the left needle. For a yarn over, just omit all the bold stuff. What's left in italics is a yarn over.

For increases it depends on which one you want.

make one using bar between stitches in previous row:
I always twist this kind of increase to avoid extra holes. With right hand needle pick up the bar between the stitches and deposit it onto the left hand needle with the leading leg in the back and knit as usual.

knit front and back
do the front leg first, knitting it normally but don't slide it off the left hand needle. Now go behind the left needle so that you can "knit" the back leg of the same stitch just like any other knit stitch. Now you can take it off the needle (you will remove one from the left needle but have 2 in its place on the right needle.

Words are a lot harder to use than pictures, I can take a few pics of the steps of either and send them to you off forum. I am getting ready to leave for a camping trip so I won't be able to help you until I get back.

As for tension, this took time. First I had to learn how to tell my tension between knits and purls was inconsistant. Then I started learning how to control the purls so they matched the knits. I usually use the needle size called for, at least now that I understand the purpoes of different needle sizes.

Look at a row of your knitting. If there is a lot of loop not touching the needle then the needle is not what is sizing your stitches. It should not be tight or you won't be able to work the stitch but most of the slack you need to work a stitch is borrowed from the stiches next to it and returned when the stitch is finished

TTFN

Flossie in SD
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haleighanna
New Pal

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 07/25/2006 :  11:22:50 AM  Show Profile Send haleighanna a Private Message
Continental all the way. I learned to crochet first and when I learned to knit, I couldn't understand why I didn't just hold the yarn in my left hand and "scoop" it up. I also knit quickly because of this. And I, too, have had problems teaching it to someone else.

haleighanna
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Momma78239
Permanent Resident

USA
4859 Posts

Posted - 07/25/2006 :  11:52:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Momma78239's Homepage  Send Momma78239 a Yahoo! Message Send Momma78239 a Private Message
If you want to see different techniques done in either continental or english style, go to http://www.knittinghelp.com. She demonstrates everything both ways. She purls a little differently than I do, but her demos are quite good and should help a lot.

I knit Continental and have never had a problem with ANY knitting technique. I also DON'T tug the yarn to tighten up the stitch. Many knitters, both English and Continental, so this, and it's VERY unneccessary. The next stitch always tightens up the one before and you'll knit faster and more evenly if you don't pull the yarn after each stitch.

-WendyM[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v632/Momma78239/smallspindlepic.gif[/IMG]
And all the women that were wise hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, both of blue, and of purple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen. Exodus 35:25
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Flossie
Warming Up

USA
64 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2006 :  11:28:15 PM  Show Profile Send Flossie a Private Message
Hey Wendy,

I am interested in how to keep my purls the same tension as my knits without removing the extra yarn that is pulled as I work the stitch from the left needle. Before I took my first kntting class last spring, I didn't even know that I had a tension difference. The class project had lots of stockinett and the teacher drew my attention to the rather pronounced rowing in my knitting. The little tug on purls seems to have corrected the problem for me. My stockinette is much smoother now and the rowing is gone. I don't notice it slowing me down. However, I am always interested in improving my technique and welcome your help.

Thanks

Flossie in SD
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