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 Felting without a washer?
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amc.knits
New Pal

7 Posts

Posted - 03/28/2005 :  5:40:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit amc.knits's Homepage Send amc.knits a Private Message
Hi All!

I'm itching to try felting because someone sent me a pair of unfelted Fuzzyfeet from Knitty. The problem is that I don't have a washer in the apartment. It would be very expensive to felt this one item at the laundromat.

So I've been looking into other options such as felting by hand and needle felting. I have a couple of questions. Does needle felting produce the same effect as felting by hand or in the washer? My other question is what kind of tools are absolutely necessary in order to needle felt. Would something like this suffice?

http://www.joann.com/catalog.jhtml?CATID=82328&PRODID=105381

Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Amy in Boston
Check out my blog at http://little_one.typepad.com

meowy
Chatty Knitter

USA
299 Posts

Posted - 03/28/2005 :  7:15:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit meowy's Homepage Send meowy a Private Message
For hand felting, I saw on a craft show.. I think Crafter's Coast maybe.. the lady soaked the hat she knitted, then put it in a ziplock bag with a little soap. Then sealed the bag and sort of kneaded it for a while. I guess she repeated the process till it felted down. I have't tried it yet though, but it looks like it'd be easier than standing at the ktichen sink forever.

Needle felting I do with dry yarn/roving onto a dry project, not sure if it's always done dry or not though. I use single needles, since I don't have a wooden holder. Sometimes I just do random designs, other times i cut templates out of card stock and lay it over the roving I want to felt down so I can needlefelt the edge of the design, then fold the excess roving into the center and felt it too, or trim it off.

You might try buying a kit, then you'll get the basic needles and some roving and probably some instructionst oo.

I use some needles, I have an old wooden cutting board I set on my lap to protect against stabs, a couple clean kitchen sponges, an old mouse pad, some roving and I save scraps of wool yarn for needle felting to other projects too :)

My needlefelt attempts have all been on knit projects that I machine washer felted, rather than actually making sculptures like a lot of sites show.

- meowy
- Knitting a Rat's Nest
- http://knit.strayalleycat.com
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Lanea
Permanent Resident

USA
5189 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2005 :  06:48:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lanea's Homepage Send Lanea a Private Message
You don't want to needle-felt those fuzzyfeet--it would take forever and be very boring. Now, if you want to add designs to them after you felt them, then needle-felting is a great option. Needle felting is done dry so as not to rust the needles.

You can felt them in your sink or bathtub just fine. Wet felting needs soap (or some other chemical agent to raise the scales on the wool--soap is fine), hot water, agitation, and maybe a cold water shock. Fill your tub, toss in the soap and the fuzzy feet, and get to stomping and swishing and kneading. They'll felt up relatively quickly and you'll be able to stop at just the right time.

http://crazylaneas.blogspot.com/
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JulieB
Gabber Extraordinaire

Australia
521 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2005 :  6:00:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit JulieB's Homepage Send JulieB a Private Message
I second Lanea. I felted my fuzzy feet by hand in the kitchen sink and they worked out fine. I put enough just boiling water in the sink to cover the "feet", put on a pair of rubber gloves, squirted in some dishwashing liquid and scrubbed away. You could try filling a second bowl with some ice water to shock them, but I didn't need it, I just rinsed thoroughly in cool water when I was done.

They will work out just fine - promise!

Julie.
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