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kristajo
Gabber Extraordinaire

Canada
436 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2003 :  10:49:51 AM  Show Profile Send kristajo a Private Message
I picked up a skein of Fleece Artist silk at my local yarn store yesterday... I couldn't help myself! $15 for a 250g hank of pure silk was too good a deal to pass up. It's a copper brown colour with flecks of red and green and gold in it, and it's quite thin. I'm still swatching, but I think it's going to come out at sport weight, which is excellent, because I want to make a tank with it and there's a lovely racerback one in the Interweave Knits Fall 2002 issue. However, I've never knit with silk before, so there are some questions I must answer before proceeding, especially since the original pattern is written for a mohair/wool blend:

I've never knit with silk before. I assume it has similar properties to cotton re: the necessity of tight gauge, growing, etc? Not that I've ever knit with cotton before, except a dishcloth or two....

I want to wash my swatch, in case it expands hugely or something. How should one wash a silk swatch?

My bust size is aout 38 1/2" in my favourite bra. The pattern comes in 35, 37, 39, 42, and 45" versions. I measured a tank I already have (it's not handknit, it's just stretchy fabric) in the fit I want, and it came out to 37". So it seems I should make that size, but is the silk going to stretch a lot? My thought at the moment is that 37 should be fine because the top I measured was stretchy.

The bottom, neck, and armhole edgings are all done in seed stitch. Should I switch to ribbing, because it's silk?

Thanks for any help anyone can provide!
Krista Jo
http://knitwit.blogspot.com


fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2003 :  8:37:48 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
http://knitting.about.com/blyarn.htm
scroll down and learn the characteristics of silk.

http://www.handpaintheaven.com/patq-s.html
Here is a link to some silk knitting patterns. They have an email listed and might be able to answer your questions.

http://www.lindascraftique.com/index.htm
This is a link that sells fleece artist yarns

http://www.aurorasilk.com/info/cheryl_faq.shtml
This link has washing instructions for silk yarns and a lot of information about silks.

fran
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2003 :  8:37:48 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
http://knitting.about.com/blyarn.htm
scroll down and learn the characteristics of silk.

http://www.handpaintheaven.com/patq-s.html
Here is a link to some silk knitting patterns. They have an email listed and might be able to answer your questions.

http://www.lindascraftique.com/index.htm
This is a link that sells fleece artist yarns

http://www.aurorasilk.com/info/cheryl_faq.shtml
This link has washing instructions for silk yarns and a lot of information about silks.

fran
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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2003 :  8:37:48 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
http://knitting.about.com/blyarn.htm
scroll down and learn the characteristics of silk.

http://www.handpaintheaven.com/patq-s.html
Here is a link to some silk knitting patterns. They have an email listed and might be able to answer your questions.

http://www.lindascraftique.com/index.htm
This is a link that sells fleece artist yarns

http://www.aurorasilk.com/info/cheryl_faq.shtml
This link has washing instructions for silk yarns and a lot of information about silks.

fran
Go to Top of Page

fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2003 :  8:37:48 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
http://knitting.about.com/blyarn.htm
scroll down and learn the characteristics of silk.

http://www.handpaintheaven.com/patq-s.html
Here is a link to some silk knitting patterns. They have an email listed and might be able to answer your questions.

http://www.lindascraftique.com/index.htm
This is a link that sells fleece artist yarns

http://www.aurorasilk.com/info/cheryl_faq.shtml
This link has washing instructions for silk yarns and a lot of information about silks.

fran
Go to Top of Page

fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2003 :  8:37:48 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
http://knitting.about.com/blyarn.htm
scroll down and learn the characteristics of silk.

http://www.handpaintheaven.com/patq-s.html
Here is a link to some silk knitting patterns. They have an email listed and might be able to answer your questions.

http://www.lindascraftique.com/index.htm
This is a link that sells fleece artist yarns

http://www.aurorasilk.com/info/cheryl_faq.shtml
This link has washing instructions for silk yarns and a lot of information about silks.

fran
Go to Top of Page

Phaedra28
Gabber Extraordinaire

485 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2003 :  2:24:57 PM  Show Profile Send Phaedra28 a Private Message
quote:
I've never knit with silk before. I assume it has similar properties to cotton re: the necessity of tight gauge, growing, etc? Not that I've ever knit with cotton before,
except a dishcloth or two....


The biggest problem with both silk and cotton is that they have no stretch, no memory, no give. Tight gauge may help it keep its shape, but you'll still have some drooping. Looking for a pattern with a lot of drape might be a good idea, if the drooping would bother you, otherwise just plan to do a mini-blocking every time you wash it.

quote:
I want to wash my swatch, in case it expands hugely or something. How should one wash a silk swatch?


Gentle soap, like Ivory Snow or Ivory liquid dishsoap, water the temperature of baby's bath, and rinse gently and thoroughly in the same temp. If you ever iron silk, make sure the silk is damp. Never iron dry silk. If it gets a little dry, don't use fabric softener, use a little hair conditioner. Air dry, after spinning water out.

Expect some bleeding from the dyes, if it's excessive, add a little vinegar to set the dye a little more. Otherwise, washing silk is easy. I wash some of my silk garments in the washing machine, on gentle, which should tell you how fragile silk *isn't*! Heck, my husband threw some silk shorts of mine into the wash with jeans and tee shirts and they came out none the worse for the experience.

quote:
My bust size is aout 38 1/2" in my favourite bra. The pattern comes in 35, 37, 39, 42, and 45" versions. I measured a tank I already have (it's not handknit, it's
just stretchy fabric) in the fit I want, and it came out to 37". So it seems I should make that size, but is the silk going to stretch a lot? My thought at the
moment is that 37 should be fine because the top I measured was stretchy.


Because silk won't do a lot of stretching, and because it won't bounce back into shape, I'd go with the 39" size. If you make the smaller size, depending on the ease built into the pattern, you risk overstretching the yarn and having it sag out on you.

quote:
The bottom, neck, and armhole edgings are all done in seed stitch. Should I switch to ribbing, because it's silk?



Seed stitch should be fine, no reason to switch to ribbing unless you want it to pull in more. Seed stitch and ribbing are both used as edgings because they'll stay flat. Ribbing pulls in, seed stitch really doesn't. That's the only decision to make, whether or not you want it to pull in.

I would stick to the seed stitch, myself, because the ribbing will pull out of shape in silk pretty quickly because of the lack of stretch.

Good luck!

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Phaedra28
Gabber Extraordinaire

485 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2003 :  2:24:57 PM  Show Profile Send Phaedra28 a Private Message
quote:
I've never knit with silk before. I assume it has similar properties to cotton re: the necessity of tight gauge, growing, etc? Not that I've ever knit with cotton before,
except a dishcloth or two....


The biggest problem with both silk and cotton is that they have no stretch, no memory, no give. Tight gauge may help it keep its shape, but you'll still have some drooping. Looking for a pattern with a lot of drape might be a good idea, if the drooping would bother you, otherwise just plan to do a mini-blocking every time you wash it.

quote:
I want to wash my swatch, in case it expands hugely or something. How should one wash a silk swatch?


Gentle soap, like Ivory Snow or Ivory liquid dishsoap, water the temperature of baby's bath, and rinse gently and thoroughly in the same temp. If you ever iron silk, make sure the silk is damp. Never iron dry silk. If it gets a little dry, don't use fabric softener, use a little hair conditioner. Air dry, after spinning water out.

Expect some bleeding from the dyes, if it's excessive, add a little vinegar to set the dye a little more. Otherwise, washing silk is easy. I wash some of my silk garments in the washing machine, on gentle, which should tell you how fragile silk *isn't*! Heck, my husband threw some silk shorts of mine into the wash with jeans and tee shirts and they came out none the worse for the experience.

quote:
My bust size is aout 38 1/2" in my favourite bra. The pattern comes in 35, 37, 39, 42, and 45" versions. I measured a tank I already have (it's not handknit, it's
just stretchy fabric) in the fit I want, and it came out to 37". So it seems I should make that size, but is the silk going to stretch a lot? My thought at the
moment is that 37 should be fine because the top I measured was stretchy.


Because silk won't do a lot of stretching, and because it won't bounce back into shape, I'd go with the 39" size. If you make the smaller size, depending on the ease built into the pattern, you risk overstretching the yarn and having it sag out on you.

quote:
The bottom, neck, and armhole edgings are all done in seed stitch. Should I switch to ribbing, because it's silk?



Seed stitch should be fine, no reason to switch to ribbing unless you want it to pull in more. Seed stitch and ribbing are both used as edgings because they'll stay flat. Ribbing pulls in, seed stitch really doesn't. That's the only decision to make, whether or not you want it to pull in.

I would stick to the seed stitch, myself, because the ribbing will pull out of shape in silk pretty quickly because of the lack of stretch.

Good luck!

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Phaedra28
Gabber Extraordinaire

485 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2003 :  2:24:57 PM  Show Profile Send Phaedra28 a Private Message
quote:
I've never knit with silk before. I assume it has similar properties to cotton re: the necessity of tight gauge, growing, etc? Not that I've ever knit with cotton before,
except a dishcloth or two....


The biggest problem with both silk and cotton is that they have no stretch, no memory, no give. Tight gauge may help it keep its shape, but you'll still have some drooping. Looking for a pattern with a lot of drape might be a good idea, if the drooping would bother you, otherwise just plan to do a mini-blocking every time you wash it.

quote:
I want to wash my swatch, in case it expands hugely or something. How should one wash a silk swatch?


Gentle soap, like Ivory Snow or Ivory liquid dishsoap, water the temperature of baby's bath, and rinse gently and thoroughly in the same temp. If you ever iron silk, make sure the silk is damp. Never iron dry silk. If it gets a little dry, don't use fabric softener, use a little hair conditioner. Air dry, after spinning water out.

Expect some bleeding from the dyes, if it's excessive, add a little vinegar to set the dye a little more. Otherwise, washing silk is easy. I wash some of my silk garments in the washing machine, on gentle, which should tell you how fragile silk *isn't*! Heck, my husband threw some silk shorts of mine into the wash with jeans and tee shirts and they came out none the worse for the experience.

quote:
My bust size is aout 38 1/2" in my favourite bra. The pattern comes in 35, 37, 39, 42, and 45" versions. I measured a tank I already have (it's not handknit, it's
just stretchy fabric) in the fit I want, and it came out to 37". So it seems I should make that size, but is the silk going to stretch a lot? My thought at the
moment is that 37 should be fine because the top I measured was stretchy.


Because silk won't do a lot of stretching, and because it won't bounce back into shape, I'd go with the 39" size. If you make the smaller size, depending on the ease built into the pattern, you risk overstretching the yarn and having it sag out on you.

quote:
The bottom, neck, and armhole edgings are all done in seed stitch. Should I switch to ribbing, because it's silk?



Seed stitch should be fine, no reason to switch to ribbing unless you want it to pull in more. Seed stitch and ribbing are both used as edgings because they'll stay flat. Ribbing pulls in, seed stitch really doesn't. That's the only decision to make, whether or not you want it to pull in.

I would stick to the seed stitch, myself, because the ribbing will pull out of shape in silk pretty quickly because of the lack of stretch.

Good luck!

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