Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: Always know how much yarn you need
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 Yarn Talk
 Seeking Advice about Yarns
 Care of Seta & Imagine (and other yarns)
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 4

kriswrite
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  8:13:52 PM  Show Profile Send kriswrite a Private Message
I've done extenisve work in the historic textiles field, and have seen first hand what washing and dry cleaning can do to a garment. A test swatch is definately in order if you want to handwash. For best results, try using Neutragena face soap (original formula) as a soap and don't use anything hotter than lukewarm water. Protect the garment from the sink drain by laying a clean white towel in the bottom of the sink. Use this towel to lift the garment out of the water, too. (Garments are weak when wet, so the extra support will protect the piece.) Don't wring or twist. Just gently agitate.

If you want a garment dry cleaned, request that they clean it only with fresh solvant; you may also want to request that they put it in a bag before cleaning it.

But don't think that dry cleaning is the "safest" cleaning method. Dry cleaning will eventually leave spots on the garment, and it will (over time) make it more brittle. I have even seen vintage garments taken to a dry cleaner--one who specializes in delicate items--only to literally fall to pieces!)

Kristina
Go to Top of Page

kriswrite
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  8:13:52 PM  Show Profile Send kriswrite a Private Message
I've done extenisve work in the historic textiles field, and have seen first hand what washing and dry cleaning can do to a garment. A test swatch is definately in order if you want to handwash. For best results, try using Neutragena face soap (original formula) as a soap and don't use anything hotter than lukewarm water. Protect the garment from the sink drain by laying a clean white towel in the bottom of the sink. Use this towel to lift the garment out of the water, too. (Garments are weak when wet, so the extra support will protect the piece.) Don't wring or twist. Just gently agitate.

If you want a garment dry cleaned, request that they clean it only with fresh solvant; you may also want to request that they put it in a bag before cleaning it.

But don't think that dry cleaning is the "safest" cleaning method. Dry cleaning will eventually leave spots on the garment, and it will (over time) make it more brittle. I have even seen vintage garments taken to a dry cleaner--one who specializes in delicate items--only to literally fall to pieces!)

Kristina
Go to Top of Page

Wabbit CO


USA
Posts

Posted - 05/23/2003 :  12:33:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wabbit CO's Homepage Send Wabbit CO a Private Message
I've seen lots of color bleeding as a weaver, spinner, and dyer. The synthrapol might prevent the sort of bleeding that happened in the Mission Falls sweater IF it permeated the yarns thoroughly and immediately. In practice, this doesn't happen quickly enough. Synthrapol helps prevent colors that are loose from temporarily bonding with fibers. When the colors are interlaced in knitting, it might not be completely effective. It is difficult, for instance, to completely wet out the garment all at the same time because sweaters that are laid flat have two layers (the front and the back). You also have to ensure that the synthrapol is completely diffused in the washing solution.

I'd use a small swatch of the two colors knitted together to test it. (It only has to be perhaps 1.5" x 1.5" for you to see what happens.) Wash it with a little Ivory liquid or Joy in some water, rinse it thoroughly and then lay it on a white paper towel to dry. If there is dye on the towel when it is dry, you'll know to look for another method of cleaning.

Marilyn


Go to Top of Page

Wabbit CO


USA
Posts

Posted - 05/23/2003 :  12:33:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wabbit CO's Homepage Send Wabbit CO a Private Message
I've seen lots of color bleeding as a weaver, spinner, and dyer. The synthrapol might prevent the sort of bleeding that happened in the Mission Falls sweater IF it permeated the yarns thoroughly and immediately. In practice, this doesn't happen quickly enough. Synthrapol helps prevent colors that are loose from temporarily bonding with fibers. When the colors are interlaced in knitting, it might not be completely effective. It is difficult, for instance, to completely wet out the garment all at the same time because sweaters that are laid flat have two layers (the front and the back). You also have to ensure that the synthrapol is completely diffused in the washing solution.

I'd use a small swatch of the two colors knitted together to test it. (It only has to be perhaps 1.5" x 1.5" for you to see what happens.) Wash it with a little Ivory liquid or Joy in some water, rinse it thoroughly and then lay it on a white paper towel to dry. If there is dye on the towel when it is dry, you'll know to look for another method of cleaning.

Marilyn


Go to Top of Page

Wabbit CO


USA
Posts

Posted - 05/23/2003 :  12:33:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wabbit CO's Homepage Send Wabbit CO a Private Message
I've seen lots of color bleeding as a weaver, spinner, and dyer. The synthrapol might prevent the sort of bleeding that happened in the Mission Falls sweater IF it permeated the yarns thoroughly and immediately. In practice, this doesn't happen quickly enough. Synthrapol helps prevent colors that are loose from temporarily bonding with fibers. When the colors are interlaced in knitting, it might not be completely effective. It is difficult, for instance, to completely wet out the garment all at the same time because sweaters that are laid flat have two layers (the front and the back). You also have to ensure that the synthrapol is completely diffused in the washing solution.

I'd use a small swatch of the two colors knitted together to test it. (It only has to be perhaps 1.5" x 1.5" for you to see what happens.) Wash it with a little Ivory liquid or Joy in some water, rinse it thoroughly and then lay it on a white paper towel to dry. If there is dye on the towel when it is dry, you'll know to look for another method of cleaning.

Marilyn


Go to Top of Page

Wabbit CO


USA
Posts

Posted - 05/23/2003 :  12:33:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wabbit CO's Homepage Send Wabbit CO a Private Message
I've seen lots of color bleeding as a weaver, spinner, and dyer. The synthrapol might prevent the sort of bleeding that happened in the Mission Falls sweater IF it permeated the yarns thoroughly and immediately. In practice, this doesn't happen quickly enough. Synthrapol helps prevent colors that are loose from temporarily bonding with fibers. When the colors are interlaced in knitting, it might not be completely effective. It is difficult, for instance, to completely wet out the garment all at the same time because sweaters that are laid flat have two layers (the front and the back). You also have to ensure that the synthrapol is completely diffused in the washing solution.

I'd use a small swatch of the two colors knitted together to test it. (It only has to be perhaps 1.5" x 1.5" for you to see what happens.) Wash it with a little Ivory liquid or Joy in some water, rinse it thoroughly and then lay it on a white paper towel to dry. If there is dye on the towel when it is dry, you'll know to look for another method of cleaning.

Marilyn


Go to Top of Page

Wabbit CO


USA
Posts

Posted - 05/23/2003 :  12:33:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wabbit CO's Homepage Send Wabbit CO a Private Message
I've seen lots of color bleeding as a weaver, spinner, and dyer. The synthrapol might prevent the sort of bleeding that happened in the Mission Falls sweater IF it permeated the yarns thoroughly and immediately. In practice, this doesn't happen quickly enough. Synthrapol helps prevent colors that are loose from temporarily bonding with fibers. When the colors are interlaced in knitting, it might not be completely effective. It is difficult, for instance, to completely wet out the garment all at the same time because sweaters that are laid flat have two layers (the front and the back). You also have to ensure that the synthrapol is completely diffused in the washing solution.

I'd use a small swatch of the two colors knitted together to test it. (It only has to be perhaps 1.5" x 1.5" for you to see what happens.) Wash it with a little Ivory liquid or Joy in some water, rinse it thoroughly and then lay it on a white paper towel to dry. If there is dye on the towel when it is dry, you'll know to look for another method of cleaning.

Marilyn


Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:21:05 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
quote:

Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher


Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:21:05 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
quote:

Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher


Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:21:05 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
quote:

Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher


Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:21:05 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
quote:

Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher


Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:21:05 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
quote:

Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher


Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:28:50 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
I obviously hit the wrong button and did not mean to quote Clara only to agree with what she said. I always hand wash my hand knits. Of course I knit so much that I don't wear anything often enough to get it dirty. But always wash them before putting away for a season just to "eliminate bugs finding a new home to raise a family".
Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:28:50 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
I obviously hit the wrong button and did not mean to quote Clara only to agree with what she said. I always hand wash my hand knits. Of course I knit so much that I don't wear anything often enough to get it dirty. But always wash them before putting away for a season just to "eliminate bugs finding a new home to raise a family".
Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:28:50 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
I obviously hit the wrong button and did not mean to quote Clara only to agree with what she said. I always hand wash my hand knits. Of course I knit so much that I don't wear anything often enough to get it dirty. But always wash them before putting away for a season just to "eliminate bugs finding a new home to raise a family".
Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:28:50 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
I obviously hit the wrong button and did not mean to quote Clara only to agree with what she said. I always hand wash my hand knits. Of course I knit so much that I don't wear anything often enough to get it dirty. But always wash them before putting away for a season just to "eliminate bugs finding a new home to raise a family".
Go to Top of Page

donnaknits@comcast.net
New Pal

8 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  08:28:50 AM  Show Profile Send donnaknits@comcast.net a Private Message
I obviously hit the wrong button and did not mean to quote Clara only to agree with what she said. I always hand wash my hand knits. Of course I knit so much that I don't wear anything often enough to get it dirty. But always wash them before putting away for a season just to "eliminate bugs finding a new home to raise a family".
Go to Top of Page

lemons
Permanent Resident

1692 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  3:18:24 PM  Show Profile Send lemons a Private Message
Rayon in general seems a rather strange fabric to me - haven't knit with it, but have discovered when washing it that if you take it out of the dryer damp-but-tumbled, it dries much stiffer than what it was before, but ironing it softens it back to its previous state. When I've forgotten a rayon thingie in the dryer and it went all the way through to dry, it was as soft as if I'd ironed it. I know some of our fiber experts can discuss rayon in more detail. Is it really a wood fiber? Do discuss further.

lemons of missouri

Go to Top of Page

lemons
Permanent Resident

1692 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  3:18:24 PM  Show Profile Send lemons a Private Message
Rayon in general seems a rather strange fabric to me - haven't knit with it, but have discovered when washing it that if you take it out of the dryer damp-but-tumbled, it dries much stiffer than what it was before, but ironing it softens it back to its previous state. When I've forgotten a rayon thingie in the dryer and it went all the way through to dry, it was as soft as if I'd ironed it. I know some of our fiber experts can discuss rayon in more detail. Is it really a wood fiber? Do discuss further.

lemons of missouri

Go to Top of Page

lemons
Permanent Resident

1692 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2003 :  3:18:24 PM  Show Profile Send lemons a Private Message
Rayon in general seems a rather strange fabric to me - haven't knit with it, but have discovered when washing it that if you take it out of the dryer damp-but-tumbled, it dries much stiffer than what it was before, but ironing it softens it back to its previous state. When I've forgotten a rayon thingie in the dryer and it went all the way through to dry, it was as soft as if I'd ironed it. I know some of our fiber experts can discuss rayon in more detail. Is it really a wood fiber? Do discuss further.

lemons of missouri

Go to Top of Page
Page: of 4 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 1.5 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe