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waterlily
New Pal

42 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  2:56:48 PM  Show Profile Send waterlily a Private Message
I also prefer to handwash my knits. I would never dry clean knits or anything else, I just don't like the smell of the fabric afterwards and the whole process of it. I find handwashing bonds me even more with my handknits; it's similar to washing your baby's hair yourself than having someone else do it for you.
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waterlily
New Pal

42 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  2:56:48 PM  Show Profile Send waterlily a Private Message
I also prefer to handwash my knits. I would never dry clean knits or anything else, I just don't like the smell of the fabric afterwards and the whole process of it. I find handwashing bonds me even more with my handknits; it's similar to washing your baby's hair yourself than having someone else do it for you.
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The Red Sweater
New Pal

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  3:16:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit The Red Sweater's Homepage Send The Red Sweater a Private Message
Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com
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The Red Sweater
New Pal

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  3:16:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit The Red Sweater's Homepage Send The Red Sweater a Private Message
Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com
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The Red Sweater
New Pal

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  3:16:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit The Red Sweater's Homepage Send The Red Sweater a Private Message
Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com
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The Red Sweater
New Pal

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  3:16:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit The Red Sweater's Homepage Send The Red Sweater a Private Message
Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com
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The Red Sweater
New Pal

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  3:16:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit The Red Sweater's Homepage Send The Red Sweater a Private Message
Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com
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Juanita in NZ
Warming Up

New Zealand
59 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:32:47 PM  Show Profile Send Juanita in NZ a Private Message
Rachel, I don't want to be an alarmist, but I had a lovely sweater in a rayon/something blend (it wasn't a handknit but I think the idea is the same) that said 'dry clean only' and I thought I'd just give it a gentle handwash, only to see it shrivel up before my eyes! It became all small and stiff, and even though I eventually resorted to pulling and stretching for all it was worth, that lovely sweater never recovered. I think Jamie's idea of washing a swatch of your new yarn is a great idea - I'd hate to think of all that work being ruined.

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Juanita in NZ
Warming Up

New Zealand
59 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:32:47 PM  Show Profile Send Juanita in NZ a Private Message
Rachel, I don't want to be an alarmist, but I had a lovely sweater in a rayon/something blend (it wasn't a handknit but I think the idea is the same) that said 'dry clean only' and I thought I'd just give it a gentle handwash, only to see it shrivel up before my eyes! It became all small and stiff, and even though I eventually resorted to pulling and stretching for all it was worth, that lovely sweater never recovered. I think Jamie's idea of washing a swatch of your new yarn is a great idea - I'd hate to think of all that work being ruined.

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Juanita in NZ
Warming Up

New Zealand
59 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:32:47 PM  Show Profile Send Juanita in NZ a Private Message
Rachel, I don't want to be an alarmist, but I had a lovely sweater in a rayon/something blend (it wasn't a handknit but I think the idea is the same) that said 'dry clean only' and I thought I'd just give it a gentle handwash, only to see it shrivel up before my eyes! It became all small and stiff, and even though I eventually resorted to pulling and stretching for all it was worth, that lovely sweater never recovered. I think Jamie's idea of washing a swatch of your new yarn is a great idea - I'd hate to think of all that work being ruined.

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Juanita in NZ
Warming Up

New Zealand
59 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:32:47 PM  Show Profile Send Juanita in NZ a Private Message
Rachel, I don't want to be an alarmist, but I had a lovely sweater in a rayon/something blend (it wasn't a handknit but I think the idea is the same) that said 'dry clean only' and I thought I'd just give it a gentle handwash, only to see it shrivel up before my eyes! It became all small and stiff, and even though I eventually resorted to pulling and stretching for all it was worth, that lovely sweater never recovered. I think Jamie's idea of washing a swatch of your new yarn is a great idea - I'd hate to think of all that work being ruined.

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Juanita in NZ
Warming Up

New Zealand
59 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:32:47 PM  Show Profile Send Juanita in NZ a Private Message
Rachel, I don't want to be an alarmist, but I had a lovely sweater in a rayon/something blend (it wasn't a handknit but I think the idea is the same) that said 'dry clean only' and I thought I'd just give it a gentle handwash, only to see it shrivel up before my eyes! It became all small and stiff, and even though I eventually resorted to pulling and stretching for all it was worth, that lovely sweater never recovered. I think Jamie's idea of washing a swatch of your new yarn is a great idea - I'd hate to think of all that work being ruined.

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achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:37:21 PM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message
quote:

Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com




The owner of one of my LYS pointedout that the Chinese have been making garment out of silk for milennia before dry cleaning was invented.

Also, he told me about a product called synthrapol, available from dharmatrading.com that you can add to the wash water. It prevents any loose dye from sticking to the garment and would have prevented your Mission Falls disaster. The web site has all kinds of stuff for dying fabrics. Bob said it's a good thing to use anytime you are washing any garment that has a combination of colors in it. The excess dye floats off the fabric but can't stick back onto it in the wrong place. I haven't tried it myself.

Anita

See my completed projects!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=977585&uid=619962&members=1
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achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:37:21 PM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message
quote:

Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com




The owner of one of my LYS pointedout that the Chinese have been making garment out of silk for milennia before dry cleaning was invented.

Also, he told me about a product called synthrapol, available from dharmatrading.com that you can add to the wash water. It prevents any loose dye from sticking to the garment and would have prevented your Mission Falls disaster. The web site has all kinds of stuff for dying fabrics. Bob said it's a good thing to use anytime you are washing any garment that has a combination of colors in it. The excess dye floats off the fabric but can't stick back onto it in the wrong place. I haven't tried it myself.

Anita

See my completed projects!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=977585&uid=619962&members=1
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achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:37:21 PM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message
quote:

Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com




The owner of one of my LYS pointedout that the Chinese have been making garment out of silk for milennia before dry cleaning was invented.

Also, he told me about a product called synthrapol, available from dharmatrading.com that you can add to the wash water. It prevents any loose dye from sticking to the garment and would have prevented your Mission Falls disaster. The web site has all kinds of stuff for dying fabrics. Bob said it's a good thing to use anytime you are washing any garment that has a combination of colors in it. The excess dye floats off the fabric but can't stick back onto it in the wrong place. I haven't tried it myself.

Anita

See my completed projects!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=977585&uid=619962&members=1
Go to Top of Page

achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:37:21 PM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message
quote:

Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com




The owner of one of my LYS pointedout that the Chinese have been making garment out of silk for milennia before dry cleaning was invented.

Also, he told me about a product called synthrapol, available from dharmatrading.com that you can add to the wash water. It prevents any loose dye from sticking to the garment and would have prevented your Mission Falls disaster. The web site has all kinds of stuff for dying fabrics. Bob said it's a good thing to use anytime you are washing any garment that has a combination of colors in it. The excess dye floats off the fabric but can't stick back onto it in the wrong place. I haven't tried it myself.

Anita

See my completed projects!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=977585&uid=619962&members=1
Go to Top of Page

achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  4:37:21 PM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message
quote:

Just a word of caution: regardless of what the label says, you should test wash a swatch using all your colors for the project together. I learned the hard way when I went to hand wash a Mission Falls sweater I'd finished with cold water and the "Chile" color bled all over the cream. The label said it could be thrown in the machine and the dryer, so you never really know. I think it's always better to go the extra step and be safe.

Jamie

http://www.theredsweater.com




The owner of one of my LYS pointedout that the Chinese have been making garment out of silk for milennia before dry cleaning was invented.

Also, he told me about a product called synthrapol, available from dharmatrading.com that you can add to the wash water. It prevents any loose dye from sticking to the garment and would have prevented your Mission Falls disaster. The web site has all kinds of stuff for dying fabrics. Bob said it's a good thing to use anytime you are washing any garment that has a combination of colors in it. The excess dye floats off the fabric but can't stick back onto it in the wrong place. I haven't tried it myself.

Anita

See my completed projects!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=977585&uid=619962&members=1
Go to Top of Page

kriswrite
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  8:13:52 PM  Show Profile Send kriswrite a Private Message
I've done extenisve work in the historic textiles field, and have seen first hand what washing and dry cleaning can do to a garment. A test swatch is definately in order if you want to handwash. For best results, try using Neutragena face soap (original formula) as a soap and don't use anything hotter than lukewarm water. Protect the garment from the sink drain by laying a clean white towel in the bottom of the sink. Use this towel to lift the garment out of the water, too. (Garments are weak when wet, so the extra support will protect the piece.) Don't wring or twist. Just gently agitate.

If you want a garment dry cleaned, request that they clean it only with fresh solvant; you may also want to request that they put it in a bag before cleaning it.

But don't think that dry cleaning is the "safest" cleaning method. Dry cleaning will eventually leave spots on the garment, and it will (over time) make it more brittle. I have even seen vintage garments taken to a dry cleaner--one who specializes in delicate items--only to literally fall to pieces!)

Kristina
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kriswrite
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  8:13:52 PM  Show Profile Send kriswrite a Private Message
I've done extenisve work in the historic textiles field, and have seen first hand what washing and dry cleaning can do to a garment. A test swatch is definately in order if you want to handwash. For best results, try using Neutragena face soap (original formula) as a soap and don't use anything hotter than lukewarm water. Protect the garment from the sink drain by laying a clean white towel in the bottom of the sink. Use this towel to lift the garment out of the water, too. (Garments are weak when wet, so the extra support will protect the piece.) Don't wring or twist. Just gently agitate.

If you want a garment dry cleaned, request that they clean it only with fresh solvant; you may also want to request that they put it in a bag before cleaning it.

But don't think that dry cleaning is the "safest" cleaning method. Dry cleaning will eventually leave spots on the garment, and it will (over time) make it more brittle. I have even seen vintage garments taken to a dry cleaner--one who specializes in delicate items--only to literally fall to pieces!)

Kristina
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kriswrite
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  8:13:52 PM  Show Profile Send kriswrite a Private Message
I've done extenisve work in the historic textiles field, and have seen first hand what washing and dry cleaning can do to a garment. A test swatch is definately in order if you want to handwash. For best results, try using Neutragena face soap (original formula) as a soap and don't use anything hotter than lukewarm water. Protect the garment from the sink drain by laying a clean white towel in the bottom of the sink. Use this towel to lift the garment out of the water, too. (Garments are weak when wet, so the extra support will protect the piece.) Don't wring or twist. Just gently agitate.

If you want a garment dry cleaned, request that they clean it only with fresh solvant; you may also want to request that they put it in a bag before cleaning it.

But don't think that dry cleaning is the "safest" cleaning method. Dry cleaning will eventually leave spots on the garment, and it will (over time) make it more brittle. I have even seen vintage garments taken to a dry cleaner--one who specializes in delicate items--only to literally fall to pieces!)

Kristina
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