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 Care of Seta & Imagine (and other yarns)
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Rachel
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  10:43:20 AM  Show Profile Send Rachel a Private Message
I'm new to the forum, and could really use some assistance.....
I'd like some advice about care for these yarns:

Seta (pale lilac) is by Berroco (60% silk; 40% rayon).
Imagine ('Campfire') is by Classic Elite (53% cotton; 47% rayon).

My yarn shop lady swears both can be handwashed, even though the labels specify 'dry clean only'. Both are gorgeous, and I have no regrets about my recent purchase frenzy!

If you've worked with these yarns, I'd appreciate the input.
Also, I'd like to understand why these yarns suggest dry clean, when other silk & cotton/rayon blends do not.

I really hope I can avoid dry cleaning.

Thanks! Rachel

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:07:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
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Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:07:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:07:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:07:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
Hi Rachel,

Congrats on your wonderful purchases! You're going to have some great fun with them.

As for the dry clean / handwash issue, I agree with the yarn shop owner. I suspect that many yarn companies put "dry clean only" on the labels to keep themselves safe rather than go to the trouble of giving explicit hand-washing instructions.

Dry cleaning can actually be more harsh on you fibers than handwashing, since it's a chemical process. I always, always, always handwash my knits, regardless of what the label says.

If it says dry clean only, this is basically a heads-up to be careful. Don't wash with hot water, don't use an abrasive cleaner, don't wring, don't toss in the dryer, etc.

You can have very good results using a dab of mild shampoo and lukewarm water. Just drop the garment into your soapy water, squeeze very gently until all the water has been soaked into the garment, then give it a few more squeezes before grabbing the whole thing, lifting it out of the water, draining your water, filling the sink with fresh water (of the same temperature) and lowering the garment back in to rinse. Once the water is clear and bubble-free, you're set. Lift the garment out of the sink and roll it up in a towel to blot out the excess water, and lay it flat to dry.

If you're truly nervous, you can always try this with a small swatch. Of all the yarns I've ever reviewed in KR, I have yet to find one that can't be handwashed.

Good luck!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

jade
Permanent Resident

USA
1543 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:25:59 AM  Show Profile Send jade a Private Message
Clara,

I've heard from many people that dry cleaning chemicals are harsh but recently I was shown some handknits that are at least 20 years old. They were knitted out of mohair, merino and ribbon (rayon, I would guess). The knitter, an 80-year old lady, told me that she had everything dry-cleaned because she thought it better for the sweater. And everything looked perfect, good as new.

The mohair was especially remarkable. No matting, snarling, fulling at all. It could have been made yesterday. I have several mohair sweaters and find it difficult to keep them from forming little snags as the long hairs rub against each other. This is just general wear and storage, not while washing.

It gave me something to think over.

Cheryl

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jade
Permanent Resident

USA
1543 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:25:59 AM  Show Profile Send jade a Private Message
Clara,

I've heard from many people that dry cleaning chemicals are harsh but recently I was shown some handknits that are at least 20 years old. They were knitted out of mohair, merino and ribbon (rayon, I would guess). The knitter, an 80-year old lady, told me that she had everything dry-cleaned because she thought it better for the sweater. And everything looked perfect, good as new.

The mohair was especially remarkable. No matting, snarling, fulling at all. It could have been made yesterday. I have several mohair sweaters and find it difficult to keep them from forming little snags as the long hairs rub against each other. This is just general wear and storage, not while washing.

It gave me something to think over.

Cheryl

Go to Top of Page

jade
Permanent Resident

USA
1543 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:25:59 AM  Show Profile Send jade a Private Message
Clara,

I've heard from many people that dry cleaning chemicals are harsh but recently I was shown some handknits that are at least 20 years old. They were knitted out of mohair, merino and ribbon (rayon, I would guess). The knitter, an 80-year old lady, told me that she had everything dry-cleaned because she thought it better for the sweater. And everything looked perfect, good as new.

The mohair was especially remarkable. No matting, snarling, fulling at all. It could have been made yesterday. I have several mohair sweaters and find it difficult to keep them from forming little snags as the long hairs rub against each other. This is just general wear and storage, not while washing.

It gave me something to think over.

Cheryl

Go to Top of Page

jade
Permanent Resident

USA
1543 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  11:25:59 AM  Show Profile Send jade a Private Message
Clara,

I've heard from many people that dry cleaning chemicals are harsh but recently I was shown some handknits that are at least 20 years old. They were knitted out of mohair, merino and ribbon (rayon, I would guess). The knitter, an 80-year old lady, told me that she had everything dry-cleaned because she thought it better for the sweater. And everything looked perfect, good as new.

The mohair was especially remarkable. No matting, snarling, fulling at all. It could have been made yesterday. I have several mohair sweaters and find it difficult to keep them from forming little snags as the long hairs rub against each other. This is just general wear and storage, not while washing.

It gave me something to think over.

Cheryl

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Rachel
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  1:31:07 PM  Show Profile Send Rachel a Private Message
Clara,

Thanks for your care instructions. I've already knit the back of a beautiful tunic wih the Seta. Now I won't fear washing it at all, and I will heed your advice to be a little extra careful.

I've recently resurrected my knitting passion, having last knit about ten years ago. I've stashed for several projects since March, when my LYS owner had to retire and close shop. Now I found a new shop (whew!)

Why didn't anyone warn me about yarn obsessions? Is there a cure? Am I going to be OK? The yarns out there today are so fabulous! And a good sale on a yarn I've wanted before....hold me back! (I'm not ready to join the 'no more yarn' club yet). When I start hiding yarn, I'll join.

Thanks again,
Rachel

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Rachel
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  1:31:07 PM  Show Profile Send Rachel a Private Message
Clara,

Thanks for your care instructions. I've already knit the back of a beautiful tunic wih the Seta. Now I won't fear washing it at all, and I will heed your advice to be a little extra careful.

I've recently resurrected my knitting passion, having last knit about ten years ago. I've stashed for several projects since March, when my LYS owner had to retire and close shop. Now I found a new shop (whew!)

Why didn't anyone warn me about yarn obsessions? Is there a cure? Am I going to be OK? The yarns out there today are so fabulous! And a good sale on a yarn I've wanted before....hold me back! (I'm not ready to join the 'no more yarn' club yet). When I start hiding yarn, I'll join.

Thanks again,
Rachel

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Rachel
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  1:31:07 PM  Show Profile Send Rachel a Private Message
Clara,

Thanks for your care instructions. I've already knit the back of a beautiful tunic wih the Seta. Now I won't fear washing it at all, and I will heed your advice to be a little extra careful.

I've recently resurrected my knitting passion, having last knit about ten years ago. I've stashed for several projects since March, when my LYS owner had to retire and close shop. Now I found a new shop (whew!)

Why didn't anyone warn me about yarn obsessions? Is there a cure? Am I going to be OK? The yarns out there today are so fabulous! And a good sale on a yarn I've wanted before....hold me back! (I'm not ready to join the 'no more yarn' club yet). When I start hiding yarn, I'll join.

Thanks again,
Rachel

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Rachel
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2003 :  1:31:07 PM  Show Profile Send Rachel a Private Message
Clara,

Thanks for your care instructions. I've already knit the back of a beautiful tunic wih the Seta. Now I won't fear washing it at all, and I will heed your advice to be a little extra careful.

I've recently resurrected my knitting passion, having last knit about ten years ago. I've stashed for several projects since March, when my LYS owner had to retire and close shop. Now I found a new shop (whew!)

Why didn't anyone warn me about yarn obsessions? Is there a cure? Am I going to be OK? The yarns out there today are so fabulous! And a good sale on a yarn I've wanted before....hold me back! (I'm not ready to join the 'no more yarn' club yet). When I start hiding yarn, I'll join.

Thanks again,
Rachel

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Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  09:50:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
That's interesting about the woman's sweater and the whole issue of brushed mohair. Even the yarn manufacturers have a hard time keeping the yarn from getting matted and snarled, so yes, you definitely do need to be careful when washing it by hand. For yarns like this, I've had good luck when I add a dab of hair conditioner to the rinse.

I suppose a sweater can survive for decades on dry cleaning alone (anyone have stories indicating otherwise?), just like human hair can survive perm after perm without falling off your head completely.

There's another issue to think about as well - smell and touch. I've found that dry-cleaned garments never smell or feel as nice and soft as when I wash them by hand. It makes sense, I guess, just like those dry shampoos that were popular in the '80s never got your hair as nice as when you washed it in water.

How do others feel about dry cleaning versus handwashing?

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
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Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  09:50:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
That's interesting about the woman's sweater and the whole issue of brushed mohair. Even the yarn manufacturers have a hard time keeping the yarn from getting matted and snarled, so yes, you definitely do need to be careful when washing it by hand. For yarns like this, I've had good luck when I add a dab of hair conditioner to the rinse.

I suppose a sweater can survive for decades on dry cleaning alone (anyone have stories indicating otherwise?), just like human hair can survive perm after perm without falling off your head completely.

There's another issue to think about as well - smell and touch. I've found that dry-cleaned garments never smell or feel as nice and soft as when I wash them by hand. It makes sense, I guess, just like those dry shampoos that were popular in the '80s never got your hair as nice as when you washed it in water.

How do others feel about dry cleaning versus handwashing?

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  09:50:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
That's interesting about the woman's sweater and the whole issue of brushed mohair. Even the yarn manufacturers have a hard time keeping the yarn from getting matted and snarled, so yes, you definitely do need to be careful when washing it by hand. For yarns like this, I've had good luck when I add a dab of hair conditioner to the rinse.

I suppose a sweater can survive for decades on dry cleaning alone (anyone have stories indicating otherwise?), just like human hair can survive perm after perm without falling off your head completely.

There's another issue to think about as well - smell and touch. I've found that dry-cleaned garments never smell or feel as nice and soft as when I wash them by hand. It makes sense, I guess, just like those dry shampoos that were popular in the '80s never got your hair as nice as when you washed it in water.

How do others feel about dry cleaning versus handwashing?

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  09:50:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
That's interesting about the woman's sweater and the whole issue of brushed mohair. Even the yarn manufacturers have a hard time keeping the yarn from getting matted and snarled, so yes, you definitely do need to be careful when washing it by hand. For yarns like this, I've had good luck when I add a dab of hair conditioner to the rinse.

I suppose a sweater can survive for decades on dry cleaning alone (anyone have stories indicating otherwise?), just like human hair can survive perm after perm without falling off your head completely.

There's another issue to think about as well - smell and touch. I've found that dry-cleaned garments never smell or feel as nice and soft as when I wash them by hand. It makes sense, I guess, just like those dry shampoos that were popular in the '80s never got your hair as nice as when you washed it in water.

How do others feel about dry cleaning versus handwashing?

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  09:50:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
That's interesting about the woman's sweater and the whole issue of brushed mohair. Even the yarn manufacturers have a hard time keeping the yarn from getting matted and snarled, so yes, you definitely do need to be careful when washing it by hand. For yarns like this, I've had good luck when I add a dab of hair conditioner to the rinse.

I suppose a sweater can survive for decades on dry cleaning alone (anyone have stories indicating otherwise?), just like human hair can survive perm after perm without falling off your head completely.

There's another issue to think about as well - smell and touch. I've found that dry-cleaned garments never smell or feel as nice and soft as when I wash them by hand. It makes sense, I guess, just like those dry shampoos that were popular in the '80s never got your hair as nice as when you washed it in water.

How do others feel about dry cleaning versus handwashing?

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

waterlily
New Pal

42 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  2:56:48 PM  Show Profile Send waterlily a Private Message
I also prefer to handwash my knits. I would never dry clean knits or anything else, I just don't like the smell of the fabric afterwards and the whole process of it. I find handwashing bonds me even more with my handknits; it's similar to washing your baby's hair yourself than having someone else do it for you.
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waterlily
New Pal

42 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  2:56:48 PM  Show Profile Send waterlily a Private Message
I also prefer to handwash my knits. I would never dry clean knits or anything else, I just don't like the smell of the fabric afterwards and the whole process of it. I find handwashing bonds me even more with my handknits; it's similar to washing your baby's hair yourself than having someone else do it for you.
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waterlily
New Pal

42 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2003 :  2:56:48 PM  Show Profile Send waterlily a Private Message
I also prefer to handwash my knits. I would never dry clean knits or anything else, I just don't like the smell of the fabric afterwards and the whole process of it. I find handwashing bonds me even more with my handknits; it's similar to washing your baby's hair yourself than having someone else do it for you.
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