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KathyR
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  2:02:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message
quote:
Hi, KathyR: I agree with you about changing the name. It conjurs up something to me but it has nothing to do with knitting, hand or machine, but weaving. I wonder why everyone seems to think you have to change the names of things.


By the way, Bev, I agree with you about the weaving connotations. Also about changing names all the time. I can't keep up with it - and I am not even all that old!! Makes me feel that way sometimes, though!

KathyR
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KathyR
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  2:02:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message
quote:
Hi, KathyR: I agree with you about changing the name. It conjurs up something to me but it has nothing to do with knitting, hand or machine, but weaving. I wonder why everyone seems to think you have to change the names of things.


By the way, Bev, I agree with you about the weaving connotations. Also about changing names all the time. I can't keep up with it - and I am not even all that old!! Makes me feel that way sometimes, though!

KathyR
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BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  2:04:23 PM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
Tonight I am having dinner with my sister and a friend and I shall ask them if they remember what we called them. Isn't it great that we all remember them but not what they were called. I'll see if I can find out tonight. Take care. Beverley

"Be kind to your neighbor, he knows where you live!"

Bev
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BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  2:04:23 PM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
Tonight I am having dinner with my sister and a friend and I shall ask them if they remember what we called them. Isn't it great that we all remember them but not what they were called. I'll see if I can find out tonight. Take care. Beverley

"Be kind to your neighbor, he knows where you live!"

Bev
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Juanita in NZ
Warming Up

New Zealand
59 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  3:05:31 PM  Show Profile Send Juanita in NZ a Private Message
How I just loved my little wooden cotton reel with it's four nails! I was born in the sixties and I had no idea those things even had a name. In fact, I remember being given a quite big plastic one that made a tube big enough for Barbie/Sindy-type clothes and I loved that too. I was so fast! As far as I can remember, that didn't have a name, either. I still sometimes look at today's plastic cotton reels and think how much fun the wooden ones were. My dolls sat on them, I stacked them, I coloured then and threaded them...I think I'm just an old-fashioned girl!

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chris
Permanent Resident

USA
2462 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  3:11:36 PM  Show Profile Send chris a Private Message
We called it a knitting spool, too, and my dad made me one when I was young...sometime in the late '50s. He took a thread spool to work and bored the center out a bit so it would be easier to use, then attached four (???) nails to the top. I used a crochet hook to do the "knitting". Essentially, you end up with i-cord, right?

Does anyone remember the Little Red Spinning Wheel? I had one of those when they first came out (I want to say 1961 or 62). I loved that thing with a passion. I'd pretend I was actually spinning...all you really did was set up the yarn just like the knitting spool then turn a crank on the side and it cranked out i-cord by the yard. One of my favorite toys from childhood. I heard that recently they've been selling for between $50 and $100!! Yikes! Wish I'd hung onto that one!!

chris

Keep on knittin', mama, knittin' those blues away!
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n/a
deleted

3 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  6:16:05 PM  Show Profile Send n/a a Private Message
We had big ones in third grade, the size of heads with lots of nails and we made hats on them, but we didn't call them anything that I can remember.

Does anyone know how to fingerknit? I've heard of it but don't know how.

Lizzydoone

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nanray
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  8:28:19 PM  Show Profile Send nanray a Private Message
Beverly and others, just read through this topic and thought I’d add my 2 cents….

I had one of those spools too in the 70’s. Also had that little potholder loom that’s still around in the shops. Don’t think these will ever go away!

Regarding childrearing today: not everyone has forsaken all traditions of parenting. I’m living that “modern” paradox – an educated, feminist, stay-at-home mom – and we’ve chosen to keep our 5 year old completely free of 911, the Iraq war and other news, including child kidnappings, etc. We don’t watch TV other than Food Network (clean shows and commercials) in her presence. We’ve told her at times that there are “adult” problems that are worrying people and that she can ask us if she has questions or concerns about something she hears. We live smack in the middle of suburbia and she’s a completely modern kid, but we do our best to keep childhood simple. I encourage her to try life without training wheels and take the bumps as they come. She and her friends play games only they understand for hours and hours, only coming up for snacks. She gets dirty and her clothes get torn. I do know that there are loads of protective, over-interactive parents out there, but there are some of us doing our best to give our kids the freedom to be kids.

And how does this relate to knitting one may ask? Well, I know as a knitter I’m protective of MY interests and it takes blood or real tears to get me to put the needles aside (grin). Is it just by chance that the women I know most like me regarding parenting are my own knitting mother and two friends my age who are also a passionate knitters? Maybe what my generation of mothers needs is knitting needles in their hands…it inclines one to say (barely looking up) “you two work it out, and if I have to put my needles down…”

Nancy

PS: And yes, I definitely heard my mother’s voice – maybe the voice of all mothers back into the mists of time – when I told my daughter who whined about being bored, “If you say that to me one more time Missy I will find you something to do”! Wow, kids still disappear at that one!
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nanray
New Pal

4 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  8:28:19 PM  Show Profile Send nanray a Private Message
Beverly and others, just read through this topic and thought I’d add my 2 cents….

I had one of those spools too in the 70’s. Also had that little potholder loom that’s still around in the shops. Don’t think these will ever go away!

Regarding childrearing today: not everyone has forsaken all traditions of parenting. I’m living that “modern” paradox – an educated, feminist, stay-at-home mom – and we’ve chosen to keep our 5 year old completely free of 911, the Iraq war and other news, including child kidnappings, etc. We don’t watch TV other than Food Network (clean shows and commercials) in her presence. We’ve told her at times that there are “adult” problems that are worrying people and that she can ask us if she has questions or concerns about something she hears. We live smack in the middle of suburbia and she’s a completely modern kid, but we do our best to keep childhood simple. I encourage her to try life without training wheels and take the bumps as they come. She and her friends play games only they understand for hours and hours, only coming up for snacks. She gets dirty and her clothes get torn. I do know that there are loads of protective, over-interactive parents out there, but there are some of us doing our best to give our kids the freedom to be kids.

And how does this relate to knitting one may ask? Well, I know as a knitter I’m protective of MY interests and it takes blood or real tears to get me to put the needles aside (grin). Is it just by chance that the women I know most like me regarding parenting are my own knitting mother and two friends my age who are also a passionate knitters? Maybe what my generation of mothers needs is knitting needles in their hands…it inclines one to say (barely looking up) “you two work it out, and if I have to put my needles down…”

Nancy

PS: And yes, I definitely heard my mother’s voice – maybe the voice of all mothers back into the mists of time – when I told my daughter who whined about being bored, “If you say that to me one more time Missy I will find you something to do”! Wow, kids still disappear at that one!
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ozknitter
Permanent Resident

Australia
3290 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2003 :  8:58:39 PM  Show Profile Send ozknitter a Private Message
When I used one I lived in the UK I can't remember what the cotton reel itself was called but we used to refer to it as 'French Knitting' I have no idea why.

Rose Windman
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Marjorie
Seriously Hooked

New Zealand
605 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  01:39:39 AM  Show Profile Send Marjorie a Private Message
Yes I always knew it as french knitting as well.The other name we called it was Rats Tails.
Marjorie

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BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  10:51:24 AM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
Marjorie: You just sparked on something. We called it cats tails.

Nancy: My mother told us to read a book if we complained about being bored.

Beverley

Bev
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BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  10:51:24 AM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
Marjorie: You just sparked on something. We called it cats tails.

Nancy: My mother told us to read a book if we complained about being bored.

Beverley

Bev
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ShirleyKnits
New Pal

49 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  11:16:34 AM  Show Profile Send ShirleyKnits a Private Message
Hello Sheila, I machine knit. Also I had a cotton-reel-thingy, we called it french knitting or corking. I also have a windey handle one made by Bond. Last Christmas my husband made me a knitting frame, I have made some hats on it and a scarf. It is basically two pieces of wood with nails evenly spaced down each piece and a bolt through each end to hold it together.You can make them as short or long as you want and space the nails as you wish.But you can buy ready made knitting boards and looms.(same thing)
No I do not like calling knitting machines 'looms', they are not looms or frames.But maybe some people are scared of the word 'machine' and it doesn't sound very arty/crafty.
Shirley

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ShirleyKnits
New Pal

49 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  11:16:34 AM  Show Profile Send ShirleyKnits a Private Message
Hello Sheila, I machine knit. Also I had a cotton-reel-thingy, we called it french knitting or corking. I also have a windey handle one made by Bond. Last Christmas my husband made me a knitting frame, I have made some hats on it and a scarf. It is basically two pieces of wood with nails evenly spaced down each piece and a bolt through each end to hold it together.You can make them as short or long as you want and space the nails as you wish.But you can buy ready made knitting boards and looms.(same thing)
No I do not like calling knitting machines 'looms', they are not looms or frames.But maybe some people are scared of the word 'machine' and it doesn't sound very arty/crafty.
Shirley

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nparkhurst
Warming Up

USA
54 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  11:59:22 AM  Show Profile Send nparkhurst a Private Message
The "finger knitting" I learned as a child involved a slightly complicated beginning and then went on rather like flat spool knitting. (My father made me a knitting spool in the 70s, btw. I used it to make "braided" rugs for my doll house).

1.Hold the yarn tail between your left thumb and the palm. Weave the yarn back and forth through your fingers--over the index, under the middle, over the ring, under the pinky. Then take the yarn back over the pinky, under the ring, over the middle, and under the index.

2. Lay the yarn over your fingers above the loops, then pull the loops off your fingers over the yarn.

3. Repeat step 2 as desired. After a few rows, pull the tail tight to pull up the beginning loops.

To finish, run the end of the yarn though the last row and pull up.

You'll end up with stockinette stitch knitting that's 4 stitches wide. It'll curl from side to side, as you'd expect.

We used it to make "Chinese" jumpropes when I was in fifth grade in 1980; I never knew any other use for it.

I haven't done this in a long time; it's very boring and even less functional than spool knitting.



Naomi

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nparkhurst
Warming Up

USA
54 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  11:59:22 AM  Show Profile Send nparkhurst a Private Message
The "finger knitting" I learned as a child involved a slightly complicated beginning and then went on rather like flat spool knitting. (My father made me a knitting spool in the 70s, btw. I used it to make "braided" rugs for my doll house).

1.Hold the yarn tail between your left thumb and the palm. Weave the yarn back and forth through your fingers--over the index, under the middle, over the ring, under the pinky. Then take the yarn back over the pinky, under the ring, over the middle, and under the index.

2. Lay the yarn over your fingers above the loops, then pull the loops off your fingers over the yarn.

3. Repeat step 2 as desired. After a few rows, pull the tail tight to pull up the beginning loops.

To finish, run the end of the yarn though the last row and pull up.

You'll end up with stockinette stitch knitting that's 4 stitches wide. It'll curl from side to side, as you'd expect.

We used it to make "Chinese" jumpropes when I was in fifth grade in 1980; I never knew any other use for it.

I haven't done this in a long time; it's very boring and even less functional than spool knitting.



Naomi

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KathyR
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  3:55:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message
quote:
Yes I always knew it as french knitting as well.The other name we called it was Rats Tails.
Marjorie



Marjorie, your memory is much better than mine! Of course we called them Rats Tails! I also have heard it called french knitting.

quote:
No I do not like calling knitting machines 'looms', they are not looms or frames.But maybe some people are scared of the word 'machine' and it doesn't sound very arty/crafty.
Shirley

I agree, Shirley. Maybe that is the reason for the name change over here.

KathyR
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KathyR
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2003 :  3:55:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message
quote:
Yes I always knew it as french knitting as well.The other name we called it was Rats Tails.
Marjorie



Marjorie, your memory is much better than mine! Of course we called them Rats Tails! I also have heard it called french knitting.

quote:
No I do not like calling knitting machines 'looms', they are not looms or frames.But maybe some people are scared of the word 'machine' and it doesn't sound very arty/crafty.
Shirley

I agree, Shirley. Maybe that is the reason for the name change over here.

KathyR
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Chatelaine
New Pal

Germany
6 Posts

Posted - 04/19/2003 :  10:02:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit Chatelaine's Homepage Send Chatelaine a Private Message
[quote]
"...What happened with the big size is you brought that to my father who hammered in four nails properly placed and you went home with what is now known as a 'knitting knobbie!'..."

Here in Germany they still sell those gadgets in every notions department. They're called "Strickliesl" (which sort of means 'knitting Lisa'). They're made of plastic or wood. Sometimes they still show children how to use them in grade school.

They seem pretty darn useless to me, although kids seem to think they're fun. The cord you get is too thick to substitute for i-cord in most applications (too bad!) Their main function seems to be as a sparker of fond childhood memories, which when you think of it, ain't such a bad way to end up.

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