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Diva Maggie
Warming Up

Canada
66 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2006 :  07:26:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit Diva Maggie's Homepage Send Diva Maggie a Private Message
I have never blocked anything before and I will have to block the "classic jacket" I am knitting from "Debbie Bliss number five" in "Debbie Bliss cotton cashmere". I was hoping you might share your blocking techniques. Which supplies I might need, etc.

~always dance as if no one's watching~

metromaples
Seriously Hooked

USA
878 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2006 :  07:44:05 AM  Show Profile Send metromaples a Private Message
You need tepid water and towels. And a fan on low (or ceiling fan) to help it dry faster. I can't imagine that you'd need blocking wires or even pins for a sweater.

Fill a sink with tepid water, about baby bath temp or a smidge cooler, submerse the sweater or parts thereof, let them soak a bit. Squeeze all carefully to make sure the water is in all of the yarns. Soak a bit more. Then lift carefully supporting all the wet parts. Place on a towel and roll the dry parts of the towel around the drippy sweater and push gently. You can do this again with a dry towel if you like. Then arrange the wet sweater in some proper shape, according to measurements in the pattern if you like on a dry towel, gently pushing and pulling it into shape. Turn the fan on low several feet from the sweater. And let it dry. If you have any of those plastic covered mesh baskets of a suitable size to support the sweater, it will dry faster if air can circulate above and below.

I'll be interested to see how others do this differently than me. I've heard of steam (I don't have a steamer) and I've read on the 'net about "ironing the crap out of it". Makes me shudder.

Jeri
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Diva Maggie
Warming Up

Canada
66 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2006 :  5:08:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Diva Maggie's Homepage Send Diva Maggie a Private Message
Thank you Jeri. Sounds a lot easier than a dressmaker's cutting board and t-pins. The cardigan is done in stocking stitch so its just the bottom and sides of the back (that's all I have done so far) that are all curly due to the stocking stitch I suppose.

~always dance as if no one's watching~
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Shalee
Permanent Resident

USA
2046 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2006 :  3:19:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit Shalee's Homepage Send Shalee a Private Message
When you remove the sweater, or parts, from the water, why not use a colander? When I have something big/heavy to block I use the colander to remove it from the water and then squish water out into sink. Then I wrap/roll up the item in a towel and push, push to get the excess water out. Sometimes I will use a 2nd towel. I also use styrafoam to pin out the pieces/item. Then out comes the fan.

Oh, yes, fill the sink first. Never add water directly to the project, if it is wool it could damage your yarn. Always check the temp and keep it the same from wash to rinse to rinse.

Sharon in NW PA
I always wanted my own library but I didn't realize it would be all knitting books!
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