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 EZ's CUTTING the tube [:0]
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Elizabeth
Permanent Resident

USA
1557 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2002 :  1:33:46 PM  Show Profile Send Elizabeth a Private Message
I am following Elizabeth Zimmerman's Knitter's Alamanac (my goal is to follow it all year long, doing each project from January to December).

The January project is an Aran sweater. EZ's method is to knit a tube on circular needles, knit sleeves on circular needles, then, after basting and machine-stiching around the eventual sleeve hole, CUT the body tube and insert the sleeve tubes. I have finished the body and am on sleeves but am TERRIFIED to cut the body (I've spent the whole month of January knitting it, and EEK, it may be totally runied!?!)

I KNOW I should trust the "grand dame" of knitting, but would like some reassurance and advice from anyone who has done this before. I do have EZ's Knitting Without Tears for extra reference (she uses the same technique in designs in that book). It should work...right???

FibersFan
Warming Up

USA
53 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2002 :  1:49:43 PM  Show Profile Send FibersFan a Private Message
What about knitting a small sample tube first to get the feel of cutting?

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Elizabeth
Permanent Resident

USA
1557 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2002 :  1:52:08 PM  Show Profile Send Elizabeth a Private Message
quote:

What about knitting a small sample tube first to get the feel of cutting?





Ooh. Good idea! Seems the obvious thing now, but I guess I was/am too task-oriented! Thanks very much!

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ibcreative
Warming Up

USA
94 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2002 :  2:04:43 PM  Show Profile Send ibcreative a Private Message
This is the same technique Philosophers use for their sweaters - knit 3 tubes, stitch and cut. Did you make a steek for the front and armholes? If you've machine stitched with very small stitches, two rows on either side of each steek, you should be set to go. I use a stabilizer when I machine stitch the knitting which makes it easier to stitch, then tear it away after I cut the steek. Feel free to email me if you have any questions, or see if you can watch the video that Philosophers put out - Ann shows how to do this in great detail.

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toque
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2002 :  08:30:32 AM  Show Profile Send toque a Private Message
Elizabeth, EZ's Knitting Without Tears and Alice Starmores FairIsle Knitting are excellent source books for this technique including detailed instructions and illustrations for steeks and the finishing of the steeks. This method illiminates the sewing up of side seams and makes it more enjoyable doing multicolored patterns as well as speeding plain knitting. I know it is very frightening to sit and actually begin cutting through all the beautiful knitting you have done but it really really works.As with all knitting you need to be very careful about placement of your side seam markers so that you stitch and cut in the right place if you do not use the steek method. Good luck.Toque

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Elizabeth
Permanent Resident

USA
1557 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2002 :  10:08:09 PM  Show Profile Send Elizabeth a Private Message
I did it!

The method specified was not a steek method - just careful measuring, sewing (with a machine), cutting. I really dawdled over this - this sweater was supposed to be January's project (I'm trying to follow EZ's almanac), and I did a shawl and a scarf in the meantime because I was putting off the cutting bit - but this really works. The sweater went together very easily with a minimum of sewing seams and fininsh work! I started measuring around the cutting area at 8pm tonight, and by 10pm, I'd machine sewn around the armholes, cut them, sewn the shoulder seams and the sleeves and finished off the neck. Now I have a sweater which I will wear to work tomorrow!



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Theresa
Chatty Knitter

Norway
224 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2002 :  03:41:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit Theresa's Homepage Send Theresa a Private Message
Elizabeth,

That ought to be a blast, following the Almanac throughout the year. ..what's coming up next for you? I've done the big round shawl (wearing it as I type, it's so cozy and warm), the baby sweater and longies, the moccasin socks and the "hurry up last minute sweater". I would love to follow along with you if you're doing the difficult sweater, but I've just got too many projects going on... maybe the nethergarments in September?

When I read what you had done in your last post, I thought "but that's what I thought steeking was... measuring, machine sewing and cutting..." ? Isn't it?

And Congratulations! too!



Theresa
http://bagatell.blogspot.com
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BessH
Permanent Resident

3095 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2002 :  05:12:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit BessH's Homepage Send BessH a Private Message
Steeking is a little different. A steek is a width of added stitches not intended to be a part of the visible sweater. It forms a band of knitting which you can cut without disturbing your garment. Invented before sewing machines, it was a way of ensuring the knitting did not unravel.

If you are making your sweater 100 stitches around, and you want to cut it down the front to make it a cardigan you would knit 3-5-7 added stitches in plain st. st. at the center front. When done you cut down the center. Acording to what I've read, if using Shetland wool, it's felting properties allow you to just fold the cut ends in. There is another steek where one wraps the yarn around the needle several times at the center point (or armhole). When you come to that spot on the next round, pull the yarn off the needle, wrap same number of times again, then knit on.

EZ and Meg show several types of steeks on their knitting glossary video. Just watched that portion last night. In Knitters Magazine spring 2002 issue, Rick Mondragon writes a wonderful technique for steeking using a crochet hook to anchor the stitches instead of a sewing machine. I am going to try it soon because I hate dragging out the sewing machine for such a little bit of sewing.



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Theresa
Chatty Knitter

Norway
224 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2002 :  12:11:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Theresa's Homepage Send Theresa a Private Message
Thanks, Bess, for clearing that up for me!

Theresa
http://bagatell.blogspot.com
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jdroeger
Chatty Knitter

USA
224 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2002 :  2:37:53 PM  Show Profile Send jdroeger a Private Message
This was one of those "too afraid to ask" situations - I had no idea what steeking was (I figured I'd find out when it applied to a project I was working on!). I don't even own a sewing machine so I figured either I couldn't do a project that required it or I'd have to go to mom's house and use hers (or, more likely, have her do it for me like she used to type my papers in high school since I couldn't seem to handle the typewriter, but that's another story! Thank goodness for computers!).

Anyway, Bess, I'm glad to know that there are ways of creating these garments without sewing. That is likely to be the route I take (if I ever find time to do this!).

Thanks for answering the question I never asked!
Jessica

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