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staceyrg
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2005 :  11:40:05 AM  Show Profile Send staceyrg a Private Message
Hello - my sister-in-law and I are new spinners. She just bought a Schacht matchless DT since she had tried one out at a friend's house a while back. She loves it. I've been able to play with it too and I love the way it feels. Anyway, I've been having a hard time deciding which wheel to buy for myself. I thought of getting a Schacht, but then I look at the traditional saxony wheels and I love they way they look, but I feel that they might be too big for our small house. I love the look of the Kromski Symphony, but I'd like to know how large those are (the entire width, not just the 24" wheel diam.) If anyone here has one, I'd love to know the overall dimensions!

Basically I really want a DT and preferrably a traditional style wheel, but I'm also looking at some castle styles as well.

Thanks!
- Stacey

pjkite
Permanent Resident

1198 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2005 :  12:17:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit pjkite's Homepage  Send pjkite a Yahoo! Message Send pjkite a Private Message
I have a Symphony at home (I'm currently at work), and while I can't give you the exact dimensions I can tell you that it's a fairly large wheel. I bought a 36 x 20 rug on which to set mine (wood floors in the living room), and it doesn't have a lot of 'elbow room'. It's also a beautiful, versatile wheel that spins perfectly. While it might be a bit large for a small apartment, it fits into my living room/studio, which is about 16 x 12, fairly well, along with a couch and a small Baby Wolf floor loom.

Pamela Kite
East Tennessee
http://fiberlife.blogspot.com/

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spindyerella
Seriously Hooked

601 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  08:39:17 AM  Show Profile Send spindyerella a Private Message
I have a Schacht DT and it is fabulous. I also have a Kromski Prelude which is a nice wheel.

The Symphony spins well, but it didn't "fit" me. I kept knocking my knee on the flyer and that isn't good. If you like the looks of Kromski, try the Minstrel. It's a castle wheel, but it is a beautiful "old timey" looking wheel as opposed to the more modern lines of the Schacht.
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pixiepurls
Gabber Extraordinaire

373 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  09:18:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit pixiepurls's Homepage Send pixiepurls a Private Message
The ashford joy has that pretty look to it I believe and it's small and portable.

http://www.pixiepurls.com
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KathyR
Permanent Resident

New Zealand
2969 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  4:14:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit KathyR's Homepage Send KathyR a Private Message
Have you thought of a Majacraft Rose? Small footprint, maybe not quite traditional but still very pretty. The wheel has spokes, unlike the Suzie. It has a double treadle for easy use and also folds for portability. Great wheel!

KathyR

Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
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petiteflower
Chatty Knitter

USA
297 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  5:18:12 PM  Show Profile Send petiteflower a Private Message
If you would actually think of springing for the cost of a Schacht as your first wheel, but you prefer the look of the traditional saxony wheels, then I urge you to look around before buying a Schacht. Yes it is a very nice wheel, but when I bought mine, I was really yearning for the historical look. I still have the schacht five years later, but I also have added several traditional-style saxonies and they are my preference, they were absolutely inevitable! There are a few readily available wheels that are a cut above the Kromski wheels and that are in the price range of the Schacht DT. Look at the Jensen's at applehollow.com. The Tina 11 is a castle style and the 24' and 30" production wheels are saxonies. Very, very pretty, and I have always heard that they are some of the easiest treadling wheels, they are made of cherry wood, and they are very versitile as far as range of available ratios. The bobbins are roomy too. You apply your own finish, which is really not that big a deal. I recommend using pure tung oil which you can order from realmilkpaint.com. It's non-toxic and really great stuff.

Another wheelmaker to look into is Ken Lennox at winsometimbers.com. His Patience wheel is a grand 30" diameter and is around $850. His Serena is smaller and likewise less in price.

As far as space is concerned, I would first figure out which wheels TRULY appeal to you and then if your choices seem to be a little large for your space, get rid of something(s) in your small house and make room for what may very well turn out to be your own true love. I have also a small house, and I have 6 wheels in my dining room. I have my priorities straight!
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staceyrg
New Pal

2 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  08:30:05 AM  Show Profile Send staceyrg a Private Message
Thanks for all the suggestions! I think I'm leaning more towards a Kromski Minstrel right now. It's decently priced, has all the features I'm looking for and will definitely fit in our living room. Now if I can only get my sister-in-law to take her upright piano out of our house, I'd have a lot more room for one of the bigger saxony wheels! I can't wait to start spinning, so I think I'll start with the minstrel. I can always get another one once I have a little more room. Thanks!
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spindyerella
Seriously Hooked

601 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  08:44:39 AM  Show Profile Send spindyerella a Private Message
The Winsome Timbers wheels are lovely and spin nicely. I spun on a Patience at a fiber show this fall. The price was well above $850, though--closer to $1200. Maybe they've gone up?
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Lissa
Permanent Resident

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  12:27:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Lissa's Homepage Send Lissa a Private Message
Please don't buy until you try several wheels. Very few people end up buying the wheel that they thought they would before they test drove.

Lissa

During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a
revolutionary act. -- George Orwell


Oh, and I now have a blog:http://knittnlissa.typepad.com/knittnlissa/
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BessH
Permanent Resident

3095 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  2:22:56 PM  Show Profile  Visit BessH's Homepage Send BessH a Private Message
Yea Stacyrg! One of the true spinning souls - if you already are planning on your second wheel before you buy your first. Remember - you can't really teach spinning if you don't have at least 2!!

And I am not teasing - at least - I am only teasing a little. I have 2 wheels and am saving up for #3. Welcome to the fold.

Bess
http://likethequeen.blogspot.com
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petiteflower
Chatty Knitter

USA
297 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  3:51:22 PM  Show Profile Send petiteflower a Private Message
Oops, yep Spindyerella you are right about the price of a Patience wheel. The base price for an unfinished one with just one bobbin is $875. But who wants one bobbin? Additional bobbins are $25 each, lazy kate another $35. You can buy the complete unfinished wheel (includes 5 bobbins, kate, and stool for $1021 single treadle and $1051 DT. A bit much to shell out without trying it out. The Serena is 20" and is $525 for basic wheel and $706 for the complete wheel, single treadle. It's $575/$756 for DT. Unless you've got bucks to burn, I recommend as Lissa does, that it is worth waiting until you test out a wheel before buying. Find out who the dealers are for the wheels you are interested in (Ken Lennox has a list of dealers on his web-site) and find out which fiber fests they set up at, or if a shop is nearby so much the better. People come in all heights and breadths and the wheel that is comfortable for one may be a calamity for another.
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spindyerella
Seriously Hooked

601 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2006 :  09:54:33 AM  Show Profile Send spindyerella a Private Message
Yes, yes! Do try before you buy. I wish I'd listened to that advice before buying my first wheel. I've always had a "hate affair" with that one. :) There is nothing wrong with the wheel except I hate it and it hates me! :) That's a few hundred dollars down the drain.

petiteflower, that Patience wheel was so tempting...and so out of my price range. Thankfully, it was also too big for my house. I'm just as happy with the Polonaise that I got instead. It's a nice spinning wheel and beautiful.
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