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barefeetslp
Chatty Knitter

199 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2003 :  7:38:48 PM  Show Profile Send barefeetslp a Private Message
We all know about Mme. DeFarge in A Tale of Two Cities. Then there is Agatha Christie's Miss Marple and the old sheep in Through the Looking Glass. There's also Betty Higden the old lady who was 'a child-minder' in Our Mutual Friend who took to the road with her knitting needles and travelled around selling her wares.
But does you know of any other knitters in literature?
I'd love to hear of them!
Happy Knitting
Barefeet

Marg in Mirror
Permanent Resident

Canada
3205 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2003 :  11:20:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Marg in Mirror's Homepage  Send Marg in Mirror a Yahoo! Message Send Marg in Mirror a Private Message
Well, a contemporary one is Betsy Devonshire, the newbie owner of a needlework shop (Crewel World) who has to master knitting, embroidery and needlepoint to operate the shop she inherited when her sister was murdered...She turns to her knitting to relax and help her think straight as she goes through her days, running her shop, learning new skills, and solving murder mysteries! (All by Monica Ferris, and all great fun!)

-- Marg in Calgary

TLWKOTB
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Rebecca
Permanent Resident

USA
1119 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2003 :  08:49:14 AM  Show Profile Send Rebecca a Private Message
Mrs. Weasley in the Harry Potter books.

"Bo ram u; to your herd be true."
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barefeetslp
Chatty Knitter

199 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2003 :  11:28:29 AM  Show Profile Send barefeetslp a Private Message
How COULD I forget Mrs. Weasley!!!
Thanks Marg for the Monica Ferris. I'll check those out.

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Hello Knitty
Permanent Resident

1069 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2003 :  10:44:36 AM  Show Profile Send Hello Knitty a Private Message
I wish I'd kept track! I read tons of 18th and 19th century English and French novels and someone is always knitting something. Usually it's not a really developed character. Knitting is often mentioned as a common place occurence - the ladies retired to their knitting sort of thing. From now on, if I read a really good one, I'll make a note and post it.

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Dorcas
Chatty Knitter

104 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2003 :  5:27:33 PM  Show Profile Send Dorcas a Private Message
There's some knitting comments in The Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett. I posted a few quotes & the link to the book on my blog, it was a couple of days ago, scroll down

Dorcas

www.dorcasknits.blogspot.com

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Marg in Mirror
Permanent Resident

Canada
3205 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2003 :  8:22:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Marg in Mirror's Homepage  Send Marg in Mirror a Yahoo! Message Send Marg in Mirror a Private Message
quote:

I wish I'd kept track! I read tons of 18th and 19th century English and French novels and someone is always knitting something. Usually it's not a really developed character. Knitting is often mentioned as a common place occurence - the ladies retired to their knitting sort of thing. From now on, if I read a really good one, I'll make a note and post it.



I'm sure there must be someone knitting in Little Women, or in the Little House on the Prairie books, and even, perhaps, in Jane Austen?

-- Marg in Calgary

TLWKOTB
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Dorcas
Chatty Knitter

104 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2003 :  01:45:51 AM  Show Profile Send Dorcas a Private Message
My daughters have told me that Laura in Little House books mentions Ma knitting so quickly that her needles would be hot to the touch after! Mary was said to be a good knitter even after being blind.

As for Jane Austen....hmm...I don't remember any knitting. I'd have to read them again, which I LOVE to do! I do remember bonnets being decorated.

It's been years since I read Little Women, seems there may be some knitting there...

I'm currently reading Wives & Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell. She mentions yarn & there's a number of times when they are doing cross-stitch.

Dorcas


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Chrys
Chatty Knitter

USA
212 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2003 :  06:28:19 AM  Show Profile  Send Chrys a Yahoo! Message Send Chrys a Private Message
We just got my DD the first couple of Little House books for Christmas. I believe in one Laura goes to sleep watching her knit, and I know they mention her knitting the girls stockings.
In the first Harry Potter book Hagrid knits a little.

Christy

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barefeetslp
Chatty Knitter

199 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2003 :  1:02:36 PM  Show Profile Send barefeetslp a Private Message
I LOVE that about Ma Ingalls' needles being hot!!
Thanks to all who have replied. This is an ongoing search "just out of curiosity".
Happy Knitting
barefeet

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chris
Permanent Resident

USA
2463 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2003 :  2:34:29 PM  Show Profile Send chris a Private Message
In Like Water for Chocolate, the main character pours out her pain, after learning that her love is going to marry her sister so he can be near her since her mother won't let her marry him because she is the youngest and must take care of her mother when she is old, by knitting an afghan that is immense.

chris (trying for the perfect run-on sentence)

Keep on knittin', mama, knittin' those blues away!
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carols
Permanent Resident

USA
1681 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2003 :  6:31:04 PM  Show Profile Send carols a Private Message
How about the most environmentally incorrect knitter of all:
Mr. Onceler, knitter of the multipurpose "thneeds" in "The Lorax" - everybody do need a thneed.....
Carol (still around, just lurking)

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socknitter
Chatty Knitter

156 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  04:57:42 AM  Show Profile Send socknitter a Private Message
Miss Silver is usually knitting something in the mysteries by Patricia Wentworth!

Woolworks lists many knitting references in books here:
http://www.woolworks.org/bookref.html



Lauri B.

http://home.earthlink.net/~bollandbunch/
http://home.earthlink.net/~bollandbunch/sockalbum.html my sock album
http://laurib.blogspot.com/
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Essie
New Pal

34 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  05:07:43 AM  Show Profile Send Essie a Private Message
There is also Sadie Shapiro who knits track suits and almost anything wearable in Sadie Shapiro's Knitting Book and Sadie Shapiro in Miami. She also solves crimes.

R.McCullough
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ladyknight90
New Pal

USA
22 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  06:50:24 AM  Show Profile Send ladyknight90 a Private Message
quote:

I wish I'd kept track! I read tons of 18th and 19th century English and French novels and someone is always knitting something. Usually it's not a really developed character. Knitting is often mentioned as a common place occurence - the ladies retired to their knitting sort of thing. From now on, if I read a really good one, I'll make a note and post it.





I just finished a book that mentioned knitting. "The Painted Lady" by Barbara Metzger. (A regency period romance novel.) The heroine teaches the hero to knit (while she is spinning nearby). She only taught him to knit, not purl or bind off, so he just keeps knitting, and calls the finished product a scarf. He said that he found it "strangely relaxing".

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Marg in Mirror
Permanent Resident

Canada
3205 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  07:20:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit Marg in Mirror's Homepage  Send Marg in Mirror a Yahoo! Message Send Marg in Mirror a Private Message
quote:

I just finished a book that mentioned knitting. "The Painted Lady" by Barbara Metzger. (A regency period romance novel.) The heroine teaches the hero to knit (while she is spinning nearby). She only taught him to knit, not purl or bind off, so he just keeps knitting, and calls the finished product a scarf. He said that he found it "strangely relaxing".



Hmmm...How did he end up with a finished product?!

-- Marg in Calgary

TLWKOTB
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izhota@hotmail.com
New Pal

1 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  07:38:43 AM  Show Profile Send izhota@hotmail.com a Private Message

I think Emma Bovary in Madame Bovary knits, too.
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Parrot Girl
Permanent Resident

2129 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  07:44:59 AM  Show Profile Send Parrot Girl a Private Message
And doesn't Miss Marple knit? I haven't read her in a long time, but I'm sure I remember that, and her going to the yarn shop from time to time. Oops, someone already said that.
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katxena
Chatty Knitter

USA
330 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  09:17:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit katxena's Homepage Send katxena a Private Message
I don't recall any Jane Austen characters who knit, and I would be really surprised if any of them were knitters. They were all gentry and I think knitting had not become a leisure activity yet (like embroidery or quilling had). 18th century knitters would have been in the lower classes knitting for their livelihoods -- not elite women trying to become "accomplished" enough to win the attentions of a rich man.

Kris
http://www.papaya-palace.com
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katxena
Chatty Knitter

USA
330 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  09:27:17 AM  Show Profile  Visit katxena's Homepage Send katxena a Private Message
I don't recall any Jane Austen characters who knit, and I would be really surprised if any of them were knitters. They were all gentry and I think knitting had not become a leisure activity yet (like embroidery or quilling had). 18th century knitters would have been in the lower classes knitting for their livelihoods -- not elite women trying to become "accomplished" enough to win the attentions of a rich man.

Kris
http://www.papaya-palace.com
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dvivari
New Pal

6 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2003 :  12:13:43 PM  Show Profile Send dvivari a Private Message
"The Rebel Angels", part one of the Cornish Trilogy by Robertson Davies, features knitting needles in a scene definitely not for the squeamish. I read it a very long time ago, and it still makes me shudder.
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