Knitter's Review Forums
  The online community for readers of Knitter's Review.
  This week: A strong and discreet knot for knitting
   > Have you subscribed yet?
Knitter's Review Forums
KR Home | My Profile | Register | Active Topics | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Want to make Betty happy?
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your username or password?

 All Forums
 General Chitchat
 Random Knitting-Related Stuff
 Wow.. such expensive lessons
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

oscarcatt
Chatty Knitter

USA
147 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  03:52:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit oscarcatt's Homepage Send oscarcatt a Private Message
I was looking for places that sold Koigu yarn online and I came across this link for this school in NY that teaches knitting... It is $155 for 10 classes! It just blows my mind as I can't imagine spending money to learn to knit.

Jennifer

pritty
Chatty Knitter

217 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  07:47:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit pritty's Homepage Send pritty a Private Message
Yep that sounds about right. $15 a class is the norm around here.

Kathy, knitting Mama to Madeline
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  09:27:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
Here too - actually, I've seen them offered for more, too. But the numbers sound more daunting when you multiply them times 10.

It's nice to know that our knowledge has some value these days!

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  11:05:40 AM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
It seems to me that it costs at least that here in San Francisco unless you go to the Community College and I am not sure what they charge but it is probably less and over a longer period of time. Beverley

Bev
Go to Top of Page

Hello Knitty
Permanent Resident

1069 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  11:22:01 AM  Show Profile Send Hello Knitty a Private Message
That's very reasonable. Remember, you're paying an expert for their expertise and also it's a business, not a charity. While the price might not fit your budget at the moment, remember this is someone's job and they need to make it worth their time and effort. Why not try to get a friend or relative to help you out?

Go to Top of Page

Emaruottolo
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
472 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  11:54:02 AM  Show Profile Send Emaruottolo a Private Message
I think she was actually looking for yarn not lessons.

But anyway, I for one would be willing to pay $15 a class to learn things like: finishing techniques, fair isle knitting, sock knitting and sweater designing. If I did not already know the basics I would also be willing to pay for those classes as well. I agree, this is an art, and we should be compensated as such. I took many tole painting classes and paid a lot in total, but to me that was well worth it for all I learned and the sheer enjoyment of creating in a room with others. In the long run, especially with tole painting, I made so many things that would have cost a fortune if I had to buy it and I enjoy creating things for others.
Just my
Happy knitting everyone,
Elisa

"Happiness is not the destination, but the road traveled."
Go to Top of Page

elliott
New Pal

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  12:59:34 PM  Show Profile Send elliott a Private Message
Wow! I guess I got a really good deal when I took lesoons. I took them at a local yarn shop from the owner. It was only $25 for as many lessons as it took to complete a pair of mittins. BTW - the yarn and needles came with for that $25. I'm in a Chicago suburb so I'm used to things being expensive. I guess my teacher was just a generous soul.

Go to Top of Page

mbmoody
Gabber Extraordinaire

583 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  3:26:41 PM  Show Profile Send mbmoody a Private Message
The price per lesson sounds about right, but most lesson series run for 3 - 4 lessons at most. Committing to ten classes at once would be difficult for most people, if you can't schedule a make-up session easily.
Go to Top of Page

navyseel
Chatty Knitter

142 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  8:06:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit navyseel's Homepage Send navyseel a Private Message
Most of the beginning knitting classes listed here in nyc run for about $85 to $140, up to 4 classes, each 2 to 2.5 hours. That sounds pretty expensive compared to $150 for 10 classes! I was contemplating taking a one-on-one lesson (on color work), and the instructor's rate was $50 per hour. Needless to say, I am holding off till I win the lottery!

Celia
Go to Top of Page

oscarcatt
Chatty Knitter

USA
147 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  10:28:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit oscarcatt's Homepage Send oscarcatt a Private Message
I didn't want to give the wrong impression... In my little mind I always imagined that knitting was something that was passed down from someone in the family or elsewhere to a younger person. I guess that's sort of how I learned to knit... the rest I learned myself because I was knitting left handed. The ladies at the yarn stores I've been to have also always been so helpful with things that it just never dawned on me that someone would need to pay for lessons. I guess I would be willing to take lessons if I had to... but it might be hard to decide whether I should spend what little money I have on lessons or nice yarn.

Jennifer
Go to Top of Page

Clara
queen bee

USA
4401 Posts

Posted - 01/15/2003 :  08:40:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit Clara's Homepage Send Clara a Private Message
Mmmmmm, you said the magic words! If I absolutely had to choose, I suppose I'd rather fudge my way along lessonless and splurge on yummy yarn.

BTW, did you find a good Noro source? I do know that Carodan Farm sells a good variety - http://www.carodanfarm.com.

Clara
Your friendly Knitter's Review publisher
Go to Top of Page

Dot
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
350 Posts

Posted - 01/15/2003 :  4:49:27 PM  Show Profile Send Dot a Private Message
Celia (and other NYC knitters)--The Knitting Salon in Park Slope offers a few one-off classes for $22 plus materials. Cable, Intarsia, and DPNs. There are some other two-class offerings for $30-something. The "plus material" is new for the one-offs. Last fall I took a cable class and a dpn class. Each was $25 and no material fee. Brought my own yarn. Prophet, the owner, is a good and patient teacher. They've just moved to their new location but I'm sure it's as cozy and welcoming as the original shop. Check it out at: http://www.theknittingsalon.com

Go to Top of Page

BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 01/15/2003 :  7:57:34 PM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
Hi: Earlier today I was thinking of this site when I picked up a cooking class brochure that had come in the mail. You want to talk about expensive--this is unreal, $75 for a single class and all you get to eat is a small, verrrrrry small taste. At $15.50 a class these knitting classes are a bargain. Years ago a local hospital had a fund raiser, a week of cooking classes with Julia Child. Who could resist particulary with the strange price of the classes. You could take all 5 classes--2-1/2 to 3 hours each, for $45 or one class, you picked the day, for $25 each. I think they were hoping to get a lot of one or two class takers. A friend and I took the whole week. It was wonderful. Couldn't afford NOT to take them. Take care. Beverley

Bev
Go to Top of Page

achrisvet
Permanent Resident

USA
5986 Posts

Posted - 01/15/2003 :  9:15:12 PM  Show Profile Send achrisvet a Private Message
I paid $25 for a single class on seaming and it was worth every penny. Anoter LYS is advertising single lessons for $25 to 30 on things like making socks, making them on circulars, finishing techiniques, etc.

I would certainly want to know hat topics were covered before committing to 10 lessons!

See my completed projects!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=977585&uid=619962&members=1
Go to Top of Page

BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 01/15/2003 :  9:46:43 PM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
Hi, Jennifer: It just dawned on me that you might be put off by everything that has been said here. Please know that we all like you and are just expressing our opinions on the way things are where we happen to be. Take care. Beverley

Bev
Go to Top of Page

oscarcatt
Chatty Knitter

USA
147 Posts

Posted - 01/15/2003 :  10:10:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit oscarcatt's Homepage Send oscarcatt a Private Message
Not put off at all... It did take me several tries to get the sock right with the fingering weight yarn, but I did it... now I'm wondering if the frustration would have been worth a class. Of course, I don't think they could tell me right out the things I want to know, like how many stitches I would need for this other fingering weight yarn that looks much thinner than the Koigu that I've used.... I know... I want lessons on how to avoid the tedious stuff we all hate doing, like checking gauge!

Jennifer
Go to Top of Page

BLN3320
Permanent Resident

USA
3808 Posts

Posted - 01/15/2003 :  10:46:14 PM  Show Profile Send BLN3320 a Private Message
Oh, Jennifer, there is nothing more tedious than checking gauge. Beverley

Bev
Go to Top of Page

megknits
Sustaining Member

USA
729 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2003 :  12:04:51 AM  Show Profile Send megknits a Private Message
Oh goody...

It sounds like I've saved such a fortune by just learning to knit from books, that I now have ANOTHER reason to go on a yarn buying spree!!!

Yay! Thanks for yet another rationalization!

Meg

"Do not meddle into the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup."
Go to Top of Page

oscarcatt
Chatty Knitter

USA
147 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2003 :  02:13:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit oscarcatt's Homepage Send oscarcatt a Private Message
quote:

Oh, Jennifer, there is nothing more tedious than checking gauge. Beverley

Bev


Yep, and I actually did it for the sock, but did not know that when I knit in the round i would knit so much tighter! Whoops!

The Twisted Sisters Sock workbook talks about checking gauge in the round, but it is obviously much easier for them because it's with roving they've spun... instead of an expensive skein of yarn from the store. Without having used a yarn, I tend to worry if I can make it to the toe without running out!


Jennifer
Go to Top of Page

oscarcatt
Chatty Knitter

USA
147 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2003 :  02:30:14 AM  Show Profile  Visit oscarcatt's Homepage Send oscarcatt a Private Message
quote:

Oh goody...

It sounds like I've saved such a fortune by just learning to knit from books, that I now have ANOTHER reason to go on a yarn buying spree!!!




Meg, you should see me trying to learn from books. I basically learned to knit on my own, with a little help from my right-handed mom. Now that I'm trying to learn to do different sorts of bind-ons, stitches, etc etc, I'm having the worst time! I have the Vogue book of knitting. The pictures confuse me. I don't know if it's just because I'm a leftie or what... but they do have leftie instructions for simple purl and knit stitches and I look at the pictures and have no idea what they are doing either! I couldn't figure out the suspended cast off to save my life!

Jennifer
Go to Top of Page

Lissa
Permanent Resident

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2003 :  07:26:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lissa's Homepage Send Lissa a Private Message
Does anyone live close enough to Jennifer to meet her somewhere and give her a hand? I hate to think of someone getting frustrated when just seeing the action in...well, action would likely make it all click for you. Where do you live, Jen?

Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Knitter's Review Forums © 2001-2014 Knitter's Review Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 2.08 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
line This week's bandwidth
kindly brought to you by


and by knitters like you.
How can I sponsor?


line subscribe to Knitter's Reviwe