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 Keeping moths away from wool
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Dot
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
350 Posts

Posted - 05/04/2002 :  6:10:56 PM  Show Profile Send Dot a Private Message
A question about cedar. Friends are residing their house with cedar and I've got a nice bag full of remnants. Even though it's solid cedar it gives off very little scent. And even sanding doesn't release the scent like it does on cedar chips I've bought over the years at the farmers' market for my wool sweaters. I've been using cedarwood incense to store my yarn and it has a very strong cedar odor. But I can't find anything on the packaging to tell me if it's natural or not. Meaning, it may smell like cedar but moths may know the difference. (And believe me, moths LOVE my apartment.) Any info would be appreciated.



ajar
Chatty Knitter

USA
174 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2002 :  11:12:56 AM  Show Profile Send ajar a Private Message
Eastern redwood cedar is the aromatic cedar used for keeping mothes away and lining closets. Western redwood cedar is what is used for siding, shingles, decking, and outside funiture. It is not nearly as fragrant as eastern redwood cedar.

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MarionB
New Pal

30 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2002 :  1:23:20 PM  Show Profile Send MarionB a Private Message
Moths! I first met them as a farm girl. My Mom used those horrid smelling moth balls, but they did the trick. I would not use them myself--fumes aren't healthy for us either.

Then I moved to the city and found them here as well.

Found a wood supplier that had cedar boards. Bought one and cut cute shapes with my jigsaw. Drilled holes to put a hanging ribbon in. The scraps are bagged into cloth scraps and work just fine. Hang them in your closet, on your hangers, and put in your storage areas.

Meg Swansen, I believe, uses lavender oil in the rinse to deter them.

I have also seen herbal sachets specifically for varmints such as moths in a home products catalog.

Hope this helps.


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Anweknit
Warming Up

United Kingdom
63 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2002 :  2:09:24 PM  Show Profile Send Anweknit a Private Message
I can't speak about North American moths, but what I have found successful in deterring British moths, is to put a bar of ordinary bathroom soap (usually something inexpensive)in with a couple of packets of yarn. We can't usually get cedar wood here ,but I have tried the cedar aromatherapy oil and that works as well.Most British yarns are not pure wool but have some acrylic type fibre in their content, so perhaps that makes the difference to the keeping qualities?

Anwen
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schoolmama
Permanent Resident

USA
2310 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2002 :  2:32:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit schoolmama's Homepage Send schoolmama a Private Message
That is right, about lavendar. Eucanlan wool wash now has one with lavendar in it. I have lavendar in my herb garden, think I will make a pillow or sachet with some! "course I don't have much wool yet, but working on it! It's too hot here to make much from wool! Barb

P.S. If you have a pet rabbit, keep it away from the cedar, wood, chips whatever. It apparently gives of a gas which is harmful to rabbits! I read that on a website about taking care of pet rabbits. Someone had mentioned it before to me, but I didn't know why it was bad. Wondering if it is a problem for US??
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pnitter
New Pal

USA
18 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2002 :  4:09:04 PM  Show Profile Send pnitter a Private Message
I find that lavendar works quite well, and what I do is clip it from my garden, dry it out, and stuff it into empty tea bags, which you can find at stores that sell a lot of loose tea, and sometimes the health food stores. You can also buy lavendar rather inexpensively at the afforementioned places, and I recently bought a pound of it at a local restaurant, who in turn bought it from a distributor. It was quite cheap, like $19. A pound is enough for hundreds of sachets. If you can't find the tea bags, use cheesecloth, tie the ends with yarn, and hang them on hangers in your closet to refresh clothes. I also put these into my drawers, and it is nice in the morning when I pull out teeshirts and underwear to smell the freshness.

I recently read a recipe, and saw in a store an herbal sachet with a similar recipe: rosemary leaves, thyme leaves, lavendar, and whole cloves. I may try this out --

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Sequin
New Pal

37 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2002 :  4:34:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Sequin's Homepage Send Sequin a Private Message
I make little sachets using dried lavender and cedar shavings. I hang them in my closet, tuck them into my shoes and drawers, and throw them in my gym bag. Really an all around great moth repellent / deodorizer!
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Dot
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
350 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2002 :  5:51:22 PM  Show Profile Send Dot a Private Message
Thank you all! I'm going to use the cedar pieces to line a couple of drawers and also in bags storing wool...along with lavender sachets! My local spice store sells dried lavender...just that I'm usually buying it for cooking. That should foil the varmints!

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fmarrs
Guardian angel

USA
9776 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2002 :  9:41:12 PM  Show Profile Send fmarrs a Private Message
Just a reminder....don't let your yarn touch the cedar wood or chips as this will discolor the yarn. Have a few layers of paper or cloth between them.

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mom.inc
New Pal

USA
5 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2002 :  04:02:18 AM  Show Profile Send mom.inc a Private Message
I tried using my vacuum sealer for this purpose, but found that it had such a tremendous vacuum that it actually flattened the yarn. Does give a somewhat different texture to the yarn, but it's not pleasant, so wouldn't advise using that route.

Marian Kinkead
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Dot
Gabber Extraordinaire

USA
350 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2002 :  05:02:19 AM  Show Profile Send Dot a Private Message
Fran, thanks for the warning about the discoloration.

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ajar
Chatty Knitter

USA
174 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2002 :  09:10:05 AM  Show Profile Send ajar a Private Message
Schoolmama,

Absolutley right about keeping cedar away from rabbits. I have two. But the question is why are bags of cedar bedding sold for rabbits when they know it is harmful? Anyway, I like the recycled newspaper bedding.

But back to the forum subject, whatever is used to keep moths away has to changed/refreshed on a regular basis. I would guess 6 month - 1 year depending on what is used. I had a box with sample yarns get chomped eventhough I had cedar in it, but that box was about 5 years old.

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loveswool
New Pal

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2002 :  3:19:31 PM  Show Profile Send loveswool a Private Message
I use Yardley's English Lavender soap bars in the bag with my wool and have not had a problem with moths.
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